Bill de Blasio Appoints a Radical Activist to Grow New York City’s Welfare Agency

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Steven Banks

Sandinista Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City, will reverse welfare reform and start handing out the checks to anyone who claims need.

He has appointed another extremist to serve as welfare commissioner.

Stephen Banks, the head of the Legal Aid Society, has been given the job after spending twenty-five years suing the city over their extremely liberal welfare and homeless policies because they weren’t liberal enough.

Banks is best known for a 25-year-long lawsuit that conferred on families claiming homelessness a court-enforceable right to housing at taxpayer expense — an entitlement that exists nowhere else in the country.

Banks, like Sandanista Bill, believes in re-enforcing dependency and personal excess on the backs of working Americans.

Banks sees Big Government programs as the universal answer to poverty and there can be no end to the redistribution until all poverty is eradicated.

The reality is that married, non-working mothers are feeding the poverty stream. The sociological problems, most particularly the family breakdown, are the cause of poverty, according to Heather MacDonald of the Manhattan Institute.

Married, non-drug working families who are homeless are at close to zero, MacDonald says.

In 2000, Mayor Rudolph Giuliani touted the drop in the city’s welfare rolls from 1.16 million in 1995 to below 600,000. The vast majority of welfare mothers who had left the rolls had found jobs and stayed off of welfare for at least a year, MacDonald says.

Banks, however, complained that most “remain[ed] as poor as ever.”

Banks will replace “punitive policies” with ones that “help struggling New Yorkers,” declared the mayor’s press release.

“We have to make our government work for New Yorkers who need a helping hand — not against them,” Banks said, including “making sure children and adults have access to food assistance.”

Punitive policies will undoubtedly be work requirements and anti-fraud measures. Remember when the Stimulus passed it rolled back many of Bill Clinton’s welfare reforms including the work requirement. This handout approach is both state and national under our current administration.

Banks will most likely add ineffective job training programs that allow people to not work and just loaf around in school.

Also on the chopping block, Mac Donald believes, are medical verifications for disability and cut backs on background checks. New York City welfare will be on the honor system. Poverty hawks are easy on fraud because they believe the fraudsters are probably poor and deserving.

One-fifth or 1.9 million of New York City residents are on food stamps but Banks unbelievably complains that access to food stamps is denied to too many. The city has a rule that able-bodied childless adults look for work in exchange for food stamps and that will undoubtedly be targeted. It’s unpopular with the “generous” Mr. Banks.

Sandanista Bill has been raising subsidies for AIDS and HIV-positive patients even though New York already exceeds every locality in the country.

All in all, Sandanista Bill is set to turn back twenty years of welfare reform as quickly as possible and it will have to be done at the expense of working Americans in New York and nationally. New York was bailed out once and both the city and state are now deep in debt and getting in deeper.

Read the full story by Heather MacDonald at the City Journal.

h/t Herbert Richmond

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