Common Core Has a Porn-Sex Education Curricula for Middle School

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Did you know that Common Core has national standards for sex education? Common Core was originally supposed to set guidelines for English Language Arts and Mathematics but we now know there is no subject and no topic safe from the Core.

A friend in Georgia, who is fighting Common Core, went to a meeting last month to hear a lecture by a woman who serves as a watchdog. Her presentation was on the Core’s middle school sex education program in Hawaii.

Warning! The next paragraph is graphic.

She showed a photo of what is in the Common Core curriculum for health education. It had an educator from Hawaii at an easel with the following written on it: 1. Oral Sex: mouth on genitals; 2. Vaginal Sex: penis enters vagina; 3. Anal Sex: Penis enters anus.

That’s not all.

She said the word”sex” is being replaced with “gender”. What that means is instead of male and female, it will take in lesbian, gay, transgender, genderqueer, pansexual, third gender, and so on, people who represent about 3.4% of our population.

Parents in Georgia aren’t allowed to have a copy of the teachers’ guide, curricula, and worksheets. Scroll down to the story after clicking this link.

Why do we need the school to teach these things to our 11 to 13 year olds?

Common Core is based on Constructivist principles. All instruction is standards-based, including sex education.

Most states that have signed onto the standards have not implemented the sex education curricula yet but it’s coming. Colorado is developing theirs.

Colorado passed a law requiring schools that take state funds to reach out to the gay community when developing their sex education curricula. The curricula must be “culturally sensitive”.

In Colorado’s curricula, children will be taught not to assume a person wearing a dress is a girl, but to think the person could be whatever sex they felt like at the moment.

Analagous to that would be: That’s not a flower. That flower could be a bumble bee so don’t judge that flower.

What a crock!

Everything is relative according to the Core-ists. We will all think alike. Common Core is a one-size-fits-all curricula.

Benjamin Bloom, a disciple of Constructivist, John Dewey, described it well: “… a student attains ‘higher order thinking’ when he no longer believes in right or wrong. A large part of what we call good teaching is a teacher’s ability to obtain affective objectives by challenging the student’s fixed beliefs… a large part of what we call teaching is that the teacher should be able to use education to reorganize a child’s thoughts, attitudes, and feelings.”

John Dewey,  once said, “Children who know how to think for themselves spoil the harmony of the collective society which is coming, where everyone is interdependent.”

Harvard professor, Chester Pierce, a constructivist said: “Every child in America entering school at the age of five is insane because he comes to school with certain allegiances to our founding fathers, toward our elected officials, toward his parents, toward a belief in a supernatural being, and toward the sovereignty of this nation as a separate entity. It’s up to you as teachers to make all these sick children well – by creating the international child of the future.”

Core-ists say that the curricula will concentrate on abstinence from sex but in Colorado, only 4.7% of the sex education curricula is devoted to abstinence. That is not what parents want.

A 2003 Zogby poll showed that 79 percent of parents want their teens to be taught to refrain from sexual activity until marriage or at least until they have an adult relationship leading to marriage. Additionally, 91 percent of parents want teens taught that “the best choice is for sexual intercourse to be linked to love, intimacy and commitment.”

Only 2 percent of parents believe abstinence is not important and only 7 percent believe teaching about contraception should receive more emphasis than teaching about abstinence.

In general, Common Core teaches how and what to teach with little freedom for creativity on the part of teachers or for individuality on the part of students. It treats teachers and students as peers and it regards children as buckets to be filled. It sets education back a hundred years.

Parents will find they have less and less to say about what their children are learning. As Constructivist John Goodlad said, “Public education has served as a check on the power of parents, and this is another powerful reason for maintaining it.”

Opting-out might not be an option at some point.

Every time they put a new curriculum like sex education into the schools, there is less time for English language arts, math, science and history, but most parents believe there is a need for sex education in the schools. Is this what they want though?

Have you read Aldous Huxley’s dystopian novel, Brave New World? Maybe you should.

Read more about Common Core Sex on this link.

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