Common Core Teaches Kids to Hate America

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Common Core: Hate World War II America, Hate What America Represents

What better way for the leftists to destroy our belief in what America stands for then to destroy our finest hours by demonizing WWII America. lauding the enemy of the day, and rewriting what really happened during those four horrific years?

World War II America was the worst of times and the best of times. We were under siege by a force so profoundly evil that it was as if Hell was swallowing us up. It was also the best of times because it was then that we saw the mettle of the men and women in our country. We saw an entire country band together at amazing speed to unite as one, sacrificing themselves to save not only ourselves, but the world. They were the Greatest Generation.

After the war, we dealt with the enemy with great mercy and spent our own money and time rebuilding and protecting the very people who would have destroyed us.

Townhall has an article you might want to read describing Common Core’s literary version of what students need to know about World War II. The only purpose this so-called literature has is to belittle the sacrifices of our military and rewrite history. It is blatant propaganda with mandatory brainwashing.

Literature is the front for an attack on our history.

While I wasn’t alive during World War II, I always felt very close to it because the elders in my life wanted me to know why the war was fought and what it meant for our freedoms.

My father signed up to serve when he was not yet 17 using a forged birth certificate. Growing up, I heard stories of the merciless massacre at Pearl Harbor, of the suffering of my two uncles in the German Prisoner of War camps where they were tortured and starved, and of the Fascism that ruled Italy.

Mom and Dad

My Mom and Dad. My father served so Common Core could diminish his sacrifice more than sixty years later. He won the Bronze Star, two purple hearts, among other medals. He did it for his country and for the future generations.

The suffering of the people rages through my mind when I think of war as does the bravery of the men and women of the Greatest Generation who sacrificed everything so we would not suffer their fate. All that goes through my mind as I read about the texts our children are being forced to read, believe, and regurgitate.

World War II was a war that we entered late. No one wanted to go to war. Winston Churchill said if we had done something about Hitler a decade earlier, even a few years earlier, we would have avoided war and the atrocities the evil AXIS imposed on the world.

Hitler brutally conquered country after country despite treaties and promises that he wouldn’t. Atrocities he committed are now a matter of record, though at the time, he claimed Germans were being greeted as heroes and liberators.

Americans didn’t want to enter the war as our allies in Europe were being bombed, invaded, imprisoned, tortured. It took Pearl Harbor, the sneak attack that took only 15 minutes to kill almost 3000 of our men and women serving in the Pacific, it took the attack on Pearl Harbor to get us into war.

My father was never the same when he returned. He saw his friend blown to pieces as he walked one step ahead of him onto a land mine. He had many stories like that, stories of cruelty by the enemy, beheadings and limbs being literally torn from soldiers, who were captured by the Japanese despite the rules of war.

POW beheading

Photo of a POW beheading in WW II from the Army archives. This isn’t mentioned in The American Experience.

But he served proudly because he knew he helped save the world from the greatest threat we had ever known.

my 90 year old vet friend

My 90-year old veteran friend

When I was a young child, my girlfriend’s father asked me if I wanted to see his photos. He said he took them where he was stationed during the Big War. He was German and had a thick accent.

I never liked him – he was always screaming at his wife and daughters. On one occasion, someone left a sewing needle on the floor that he stepped on. As he pulled his socks off, he screamed like a maniac, “Look what you’ve done. Look, I’m bleeding.” He then showed us his bare foot with the tiniest of bloody pricks on his big toe.

It was the quietest house I had ever been in. No one wanted to make a sound above a whisper so as not to disturb Dad I was told. If we were allowed in the living room, we had to sit perfectly silent while good old Dad stomped around with a fearsome gait. He told my friend she was allowed to play with me because the Irish weren’t as inferior as most though we were inferior to Germans. She was not allowed to play with her next door neighbor because she was Italian and they were very low on his scale.

Back to the photos. I was thrilled that he thought me worthy of looking at them and I innocently nodded my head in assent when he asked me if I wanted to see them. I couldn’t understand them at first as he flipped through them while he giggled. Finally, one picture materialized as piles of what looked to be department store dummies, one heaped on top of the other.

concentration

The photo looked something like this WWII concentration camp photo

I realized they weren’t dummies as he flipped through picture after picture. Starving children, pleading mothers and fathers, old people in torn pajamas. They were in a prison, there were shacks, guards and what struck me most was his gleeful laugh as he proudly went through his collection.

He had been a commandant of a concentration camp as I later found out, a man glad to have been part of the slaughter of countless numbers of innocents – murdered or slowly starved because they were Jewish.

America’s warriors were called to sacrifice everything to save the world from this horror, from the utter destruction and cruel totalitarianism that was led by an evil force like no other. As our Founding Fathers had done, they were called and they came courageously. Today we are free because of them.

Don’t get me wrong. There were many innocent Germans and Japanese and I have nothing against them today but to depict this period of time the way this text is depicting it can only be anti-American indoctrination.

The Common Core is now serving as a vehicle to rewrite history and make us hate ourselves, America, and the Greatest Generation who paved the way for all that we have today.

Prentice-Hall has published a textbook used widely – The American Experience – which is yet another product of Common Core. It is aligned with the Core. It is literature used to teach a bastardized version of history.

It omits the context of the war while it demonizes our country – our Greatest Generation – to further extreme anti-War beliefs that would make us believe self-defense and fighting for freedom are evil and must never happen.

What does it matter, the survivors are almost all dead now. How many who were alive then can tell us otherwise, how many can fight this complete sacrilege? We won’t see outrage from those who are now living, they are so far removed.

That is what the left thinks.

The selections I have listed from the text are taken from the Townhall article and you might want to take the time to check it out.

The opening page on World War II is called ‘War Shock’ and it bears a photo of a woman looking at a stockpile of thousand-pound bomb castings with the following statement:

In this section, nonfiction prose and a single stark poem etch into a reader’s mind the dehumanizing horror of world war. . . .

Teachers are told to ask:

Ask: What dominant impression do you take away from this photograph?

Possible response: Students may say that the piled rows of giant munitions give a strong impression of America’s power of mass production and the bombs’ potential for mass destruction.

Children are being told that World War II was about our bomb-making and mass destruction.

The chapter’s principal selection brings pity not to people like my uncle who came back so beaten physically by Germans that he was in pain every day for the rest of his short life, but rather, it was about the Japanese. It is taken from John Hershey’s Hiroshima.

The Reverend Mr. Tanimoto got up at five o’clock that morning. He was alone in the parsonage, because for some time his wife had been commuting with their year-old baby to spend nights with a friend in Ushida, a suburb to the north.

This is what teachers are told to teach the children about this:

World War II has been called a popular war in which the issues that spurred the conflict were clearly defined. . . . Nevertheless, technological advances . . . [and the media] brought home the horrors of war in a new way. Although a serious antiwar movement in the United States did not become a reality until the 1960s, these works by Hersey and by Jarrell take their place in the ranks of early antiwar literature.

Have students think about and record in writing their personal feelings about war. Encourage students to list images of war that they recall vividly. [Conveniently, there is a photograph of the devastation in Hiroshima next to this prompt].

Tell students they will revisit their feelings about war after they have read these selections.

The chapter emphasizes that in every war there are two sides but the entire section includes photos of the destruction of Hiroshima and questions like those above.

They don’t mention the fact that pamphlets were dropped urging people to leave Hiroshima. They don’t mention that the Japanese refused to surrender because their beliefs would not allow it. The Japanese, because of their code of honor, were determined to fight until every last man was dead and we would have lost untold numbers of our own men while this war of suicide continued.

The questions for teachers:

Think Aloud: Model the Skill
Say to students:
When I was reading the history textbook, I noticed that the writer included profiles of three war heroes, all of whom fought for the Allies. The writer did not include similar profiles for fighters on the other side. I realize that this choice reflects a political assumption: that readers want to read about only their side’s heroes.

. . . Mr. Tanimoto is on the side of “the enemy.” Explain that to vilify is to make malicious statements about someone. During wartime, it is common to vilify people on the other side, or “the enemy.”

Hershey’s Hiroshima gets the same number of pages as Ben Franklin according to Townhall. The students are brainwashed with anti-war, anti-heroic poems. One such poem ends like this: “When I died they washed me out of the turret with a hose.”

Then there’s this:

World War II has been called a popular war in which the issues that spurred the conflict were clearly defined. . . . Nevertheless, technological advances . . . [and the media] brought home the horrors of war in a new way. Although a serious antiwar movement in the United States did not become a reality until the 1960s, these works by Hersey and by Jarrell take their place in the ranks of early antiwar literature.

Have students think about and record in writing their personal feelings about war. Encourage students to list images of war that they recall vividly. [Conveniently, there is a photograph of the devastation in Hiroshima next to this prompt].

Tell students they will revisit their feelings about war after they have read these selections.

Then the final brainwashing from the teacher’s guide with mandated reponses by the students:

Possible response: [In the Teacher’s Edition] Students may concede that some wars, such as World War II, are more justified than others, but may still feel that “good” is not an appropriate adjective for any war.

So, class, what are your “feelings” about war—and World War II in particular—now that you have read these two depressing selections in “early anti-war literature”?

From Townhall:

There is more than a little sophistry taking place here: an alarming superficiality and political bias that pervades all the Common Core textbooks (as I have illustrated in my book The Story-Killers: A Common Sense Case Against the Common Core).

There is no reading in this chapter ostensibly devoted to World War II that tells why America entered the war. There is no document on Pearl Harbor or the Rape of Nanking or the atrocities committed against the Jews or the bombing of Britain. The book contains no speech of Winston Churchill or F.D.R. even though the reading of high-caliber “informational texts” is the new priority set by the Common Core, and great rhetoric has always been the province of an English class.

There is not a single account of a battle or of American losses or of the liberation of Europe. The editors do not balance Jarrell’s poem with the much more famous war song “Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition” that ends with the line, “And we’ll all stay free!”

Instead the chapter has a poster of a junk rally to gain metals for making munitions and other nonsense. The brutal savages who started the war are merely enemies and we are inhumane bomb makers.

This is what they are doing throughout Common Core. They do closed readings in literature which omit all context except for the leftist propaganda.

My family didn’t suffer to be treated like this with a false historical narrative. Now I better understand how President Obama could close the World War II open air monuments for no reason, banning visits by sick and terminally ill veterans whose dying wish was to see the monument that stands in their memory. He feels the exact same way as these leftists. He has no regard for them.

barry-cades being added to WWII memorial

Obama’s Barry-cades

Will our new monument be to the Hitlers and Mussolinis? After all, there is another side. They had families too.

You should all be outraged by this.

Source:Townhall

 

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