Drone Piloting Degrees, Our Youth Learning to Spy on Americans & the First Legal Challenge Hits the Courts

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Do you want to be a pilot but are afraid of heights? You still can be! You can sit in an office and operate unmanned aircraft vehicle systems (UAVs), otherwise known as drones. I am very eager to get one of these degrees.

Cochise College Aviation in Arizona, Unmanned Vehicle University online, Northwestern Michigan College, Northland Community & Technical College in Minnesota, and the University of North Dakota all offer programs.

The online program is $1200 for an undergraduate degree and $1600 for a graduate degree. You can take the 12 week program for $999 or you can go as far as a Masters with 32 credits or a PhD level (40 credits) and a dissertation (24 credits).

The University of North Dakota, on the other hand is charging almost $17,000 per year for out-of-state students for their 4 year undergraduate program. Hmmm….think I’ll go to the online university.

Virginia Tech also has a program starting up.

Once I have my degree, I can fly my remote control drone over anyone’s house and spy on them. I just can’t wait. If I get a drone equipped with an infrared camera, I can look right into my neighbors’ homes. So glad that pesky 4th Amendment hasn’t even been a consideration as drones are being bought up from the military willy-nilly with President Obama’s okay.

Over 300 police departments throughout the country are gleeful over their purchases of these things. Universities and companies are buying them in what is becoming a rapidly growing industry. Drones are small (they can be the size of a bug), cheap, quiet, and they can violate your constitutional rights by spying on you without a search warrant. They can see what you are eating for breakfast, seriously, it’s a fact. Google and Apple are buying them up so they can make fancy maps.

US News & World Report reported on the little-known case of Rodney Brossart in April of this year. Six cows wandered onto his property and Mr. Brossart believes that means they now belong to him. He’s allegedly a sovereignist, which is an anti-government group that is on the DHS watch list. Who knows if he is or not, that’s not the point.

The police borrowed a DHS drone, rather than obtain a warrant, and spotted the cows from the air.

When the police came for Mr. Brossart, he chased them off his 3,000 acre ranch with high-powered rifles.

The police never told him they tracked the cows down by using drones. Mr. Brossart found out months later.

Mr. Brossart is suing based on a 4th Amendment violation.

“We’re not laying over here playing dead on it,” says Brossart, who is scheduled to appear in court on April 30. He believes what the SWAT team did was “definitely” illegal.

“We’re dealing with it, we’ve got a couple different motions happening in court fighting [the drone use].”

The police claim the drone was after-the-fact and was only used to make sure Brossart didn’t have more dangerous weapons. They wanted to be safe. (oh, please. they did it to find the cows).

Apparently, Brossart will not have much of a case. There have been two Supreme Court cases—California v. Ciraolo in 1986 and Florida v. Riley in 1989 — that allow law enforcement to use “public navigable airspace, in a physically nonintrusive manner” to gather evidence to make an arrest.

Brossart’s case is the first constitutional test of drones being used to “spy and arrest” someone without the use of a warrant.

I don’t know if Mr. Brossart is a sovereignist and if they are dangerous (though his chasing the police off his property with rifles is suspicious). I don’t know if he stole the six lousy cows, but are they kidding with the violation of his rights being justifiable?

Even if this case is justified, you can be sure the government will abuse the use of drones. The police are going to arm them in case you haven’t heard.

Maybe someone should get a Drone degree to attack other drones. It would be a fun sport.

President Obama, the Remote-Controller-in-Chief has okayed them. Numerous civil liberties groups are testing the constitutionality with lawsuits. In this video, one such civil liberties union, The Rutherford Institute, presents the case succinctly.

 

Check out the Drone Piloting Schools

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