Drone Strike Statistics Scrubbed After Filibuster

0
Share

 

The future tiny drones are here
The future tiny drones are here

On February 28th, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., sent a letter to John Brennan advising him that he would filibuster the nomination until he knew if the president believes he has the power to attack US citizens in the United States if they did not pose an imminent threat.

Our fifth amendment entitles us to due process.

Rand Paul carried out a nearly 13 hour filibuster before Holder and the White House agreed they would not launch a drone strike on US soil if the citizen did not pose an imminent threat.

The day Paul sent the letter, Graham is quoted as telling a gathering in S. Carolina that US drone strikes have killed 4,700 people, adding:

“Sometimes you hit innocent people, and I hate that, but we’re at war, and we’ve taken out some very senior members of al-Qaida,” Graham was quoted by the Patch website as saying.

Yet, Graham couldn’t understand the reason for Senator Paul’s filibuster.

The WH might have found a solution for all of this noise. The Air Force, thanks to our transparent government, will no longer release statistics from strikes in Afghanistan and have scrubbed previous airstrike metadata. Monthly reports have also been removed. The Defense Department was not involved in the decision, which leaves higher-ups.

As soon as this government is opposed, they lose transparency. Somewhat tyrannical, don’t you think?

In December, wired.com reported that the Air Force might be developing stealth drones in secret. It could be the beginning of robot air wars.

Do you trust our government with this as they plan to fly tens of thousands of drones over our country without guidelines? Senator Paul is trying to do something about that.

Continue the drone program, great, just tell us where the Constitution takes over!

Click here to see the original December 2012 and January 2013 statistics and the ones apparently loaded online Feb. 22.

Click here to read the story at the Air Force Times.

Share