Egyptian President el-Sisi’s Incredible Speech

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A Clip from Egyptian President el-Sisi’s remarkable and courageous speech can be heard below. It’s the speech President Obama should have given but never will.

President el-Sisi called for a revolutionary change in his religion to save the Islamic nation from “being torn apart and destroyed”. He called it by name – radical Islam. President Obama shrinks from using the words “radical Islam” and cowers in the corners of the NY Times and other state-sponsored media, behind the skirts of Marie Harf and Jen Psaki and under the table of his Attorney General Eric Holder.

El-Sisi spoke at Al-Azhar on the need to “revolutionize” their religion to combat extremism in ideology. His words put his life in the crosshairs of the radical Islamists. He spoke from his heart and the leadership he exhibited is not like anything we are seeing in the United States. Quite the opposite in fact.

He didn’t stop there. He visited the Coptic Pope and he went to mass at a Coptic church on Christmas Eve.

This is a man who can be looked up to. We used to have such men in the United States.

I referred to these events in another article but it deserves it’s own space. Our mainstream media is turning their usual blind eye to something that should be lauded on the front page of the once-great Grey Lady.

As President Obama ignores the threats from radical Islamists, except for throwing out a platitude here-and-there during his perpetual campaigning, and as he denies the connection of radical Islam to Islam itself, the Egyptian president is asking his religious leaders to engage in “religious discourse that is in keeping with its times.” El-Sisi warned that “the Islamic nation is being torn apart and destroyed” by extremism.

That is what a true leader sounds like.

Following are excerpts:

Abd Al-Fattah el-Sisi: We spoke earlier about the importance of the religious discourse, and I would like to reiterate that we are not doing enough with regard to true religious discourse. The problem has never been with our faith. Perhaps the problem lies in ideology, and this ideology is sanctified among us. I am talking about religious discourse that is in keeping with its times.

[…]

I am adressing the religious scholars and clerics. We must take a long, hard look at the current situation. I have talked about this several times in the past. We must take a long, hard look at the situation we are in. It is inconceivable that the ideology we sanctify should make our entire nation a source of concern, danger, killing, and destruction all over the world. It is inconceivable that this ideology… I am referring not to “religion,” but to “ideology” – the body of ideas and texts that we have sanctified in the course of centuries, to the point that challenging them has become very difficult.

It has reached the point that [this ideology] is hostile to the entire world. Is it conceivable that 1.6 billion [Muslims] would kill the world’s population of seven billion, so that they could live [on their own]? This is inconceivable. I say these things here, at Al-Azhar, before religious clerics and scholars. May Allah bear witness on Judgment Day to the truth of your intentions, regarding what I say to you today. You cannot see things clearly when you are locked [in this ideology]. You must emerge from it and look from outside, in order to get closer to a truly enlightened ideology. You must oppose it with resolve. Let me say it again: We need to revolutionize our religion.

Honorable Imam [the Grand Sheik of Al-Azhar], you bear responsibility before Allah. The world in its entirety awaits your words, because the Islamic nation is being torn apart, destroyed, and is heading to perdition. We ourselves are bringing it to perdition.

[…]

The following translated speech is from Memri TV:

Isn’t it ironic that Sisi is the leader Obama did not want because he ran the Muslim Brotherhood out of power?

Now listen to Barack Obama deny reality:

President Hollande of France followed Obama’s lead. The tragedy in Paris taught him nothing:

Introductory paragraphs rewritten after publication. 

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