Fall of An Empire


Part I, The Fall of Rome

Part II

Ozymandius

by Percy Bysshe Shelley

I met a traveler from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal these words appear:
“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

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Sara Noble

Sara Noble

Sara Noble, B.A. English Literature, St. John's University; M.S. Education, M.A. Administration, Hofstra University. World traveler. Worked with children as a teacher and school administrator for three decades. Published in educational journals, children's mystery magazines, and was an editor at This Week Magazine. I am devoted to an America that promotes free enterprise and ingenuity, values the Constitution as intended, and does not encourage a nanny state under the casuistic banner of "the common good". 

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