GE – the Post American Business Under a Post American Presidency

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A prototype of the C919 jet that China’s state-owned aircraft maker hopes to begin delivering in 2016. G.E. has been chosen to supply the engines. By David Barboza, Christopher Drew and Steve Lohr, January 17, 2011

I no sooner post an article about China’s unbridled theft of intellectual property when along comes another outrageous abandonment of U.S. business in what amounts to a complete and traitorous surrender to China for the sake of the almighty dollar. According to the NY Times, General Electric will sell its aircraft electronics to Chinese companies. China will then use it to compete with a real American company, Boeing.

It’s even worse than that. China is not our friend. They will wipe us out in a heartbeat if they so choose. They are building their economy and their military. They continue to be communists who care nothing about human rights. Doesn’t take a genius to put these pieces together. China will pose a grave threat to the United States and GE is helping them do it.

Furthermore, Obama and his National Labor Relations Board have a vendetta against Boeing because they are trying to build a plant in a right-to-work state. Could there be some connection between GE’s actions and the attack on Boeing?

General Electric, may be based in the United States, but they are NO American company. Their slogan used to be “GE, Where Good Things Happen.” I’m glad they gave that one up because there is nothing good about what is happening. GE is also known for selling arms to Iran while our soldiers were fighting them on the field in Iraq. GE’s new slogan is “Imagination at work.” How imaginative is it to betray your own country?  GE’s Immelt serves as Chairman of Obama’s Jobs Effectiveness Panel so whatever he does has the Obama blessing.

German Float While 3 Million Germans Watched

From the NY Times: On Friday, during the visit of the Chinese president, Hu Jintao, to the United States, G.E. plans to sign a joint-venture agreement in commercial aviation that shows the tricky risk-and-reward calculations American corporations must increasingly make in their pursuit of lucrative markets in China.

G.E., in the partnership with a state-owned Chinese company, will be sharing its most sophisticated airplane electronics, including some of the same technology used in Boeing’s new state-of-the-art 787 Dreamliner.

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