GOP Official Explains the Rules: Voters Don’t Pick the Nominee, Party Bosses Do

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Curly Haugland, a Bismarck businessman and North Dakota representative on the Republican National Committee, reads a newspaper on the North Dakota state Republican convention stage Sunday morning, March 21, 2010, while waiting for the convention to begin in Grand Forks, N.D. The two-day convention ended Sunday after delegates endorsed GOP candidates for U.S. Senate, U.S. House and five state offices. (AP Photo/Dale Wetzel)
Curly Haugland, a Bismarck businessman and North Dakota representative on the Republican National Committee, reads a newspaper on the North Dakota state Republican convention stage Sunday morning, March 21, 2010, while waiting for the convention to begin in Grand Forks, N.D. The two-day convention ended Sunday after delegates endorsed GOP candidates for U.S. Senate, U.S. House and five state offices. (AP Photo/Dale Wetzel)

Update at the end.

 

There is nothing you can do and this has been decided long before Donald Trump. Delegates pick the presidential nominee – it’s the rules, according to one party delegate.

A senior GOP official, Curly Haugland, told CNBC this morning that political parties — not voters — ultimately pick the nominee.

“The media has created the perception that the voters choose the nomination. That’s the conflict here,” Haugland said.

“The rules are still designed to have a political party choose its nominee at a convention,” he said. “That’s just the way it is. I can’t help it. Don’t hate me because I love the rules.”

The 14-year North Dakota committee member said, “This process was set up for Bush or Walker to win—establishment guys.”

Haugland is the maverick of the 168 RNC members and he is a staunchly conservative Republican. He’s been making the argument that the rules governing the 2016 convention are filled with contradictions that nullify whatever occurs before the opening gavel hits the podium in Cleveland next July—including the primary season’s results. Convention delegates and nobody else, he says, get to choose the 2016 presidential ticket.

“Every primary, every caucus, will essentially be a beauty contest,” Haugland says of 2016. “Now, those results will be persuasive to delegates that go to the convention. But the delegates to the Republican convention are going to choose the next presidential nominee. Nobody will have the majority of delegates from eight states before the convention.”

This is only slightly different from the Democrat party’s bosses who choose the nominee right from the beginning.  Super Delegates choose the nominee and each of their Super Delegates is equivalent to 60,000 voters which is why Bernie Sanders could never win.

“Everybody is depending on these primary results, except it is all built on a house of cards, a fabricated reality,” he said. “Everybody wants to have a presumptive nominee. There’s hundreds of millions of dollars at stake to buy votes for primary elections. The votes they are buying are worthless. Nobody wants to hear that story.”

Haugland who has dissected the RNC’s 21-page rule book said once the convention is open, delegates are not bound to vote for any candidates. Winner-take-all delegate allocations are not allowed. Because of the large number of candidates, it’s not likely anyone will reach the 1237 needed to avoid a convention fight.

As Haugland said, nobody “wants to hear that story,” because “all of the [primary] votes go away.”

“The RNC has no option except to follow these rules, until they convene in 2016,” he says.

“They can’t wish it away. All the campaigns have to operate with the knowledge that this is the current rule, to get to the eight-state threshold.”

Asked how widespread his interpretation of the rule is, Haugland responds with a grin as wide as a Cheshire cat: “I don’t need any support. All I need is Rule 40.”

 

UPDATE
Reince Priebus addressed this on ‘Hannity’ Wednesday night. If someone gets the requisite number of delegates before the convention, that person becomes the nominee, but then it goes to the process.

Source: US News

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Your headline is dishonest. He did not say the “party bosses” pick the nominee. He said the “delegates” do. And that is correct: the party bosses try to direct the show, but this year (and in 1980) it blew up in their faces. The delegates will have their say and the party bosses will have to accept it.

    • The party bosses and the delegates are the same in many states. You have to be one of the insiders to get the job in most places. The headline isn’t dishonest at all but you’re entitled to your opinion. We’re both right in a way – depends on the state.

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