Hey Look, We’re Russia Now: DEA Raids NFL Teams, Calls The Raids ‘Administrative’

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We have drug smugglers pouring across our open borders but the DEA doesn’t need to bother much with that since they are future Democratic voters. Border Patrol are being taunted, shot at, and have their lives endangered daily by them. Our children are dying from heroine and other drugs imported from south of the border illegally, but the real problem is the NFL and the incredibly unknowledgeable players who didn’t know drug abuse could make them sick and addicted.

Agents know where to put their energies and that is to make unannounced raids of NFL teams looking for prescription drug abuse as they did this past Sunday.

I feel safer already.

The confused media has been handling the NFL scandals noticeably differently. They certainly handle them differently from the Obama scandals which they never or barely mention.

The most serious scandal of course is the name of the Washington Redskins team which stood for pride and accomplishment until the liberals decided the lost-in-time and obscure meaning of the word “redskins” was what it really meant. The PC police have been all over that ever since. Some won’t even mention the name! Harry Reid is trying to employ the tactics of tyrants to stop this perceived abomination even though the name was approved by 90% of Indians in this country.

The second most serious round of cases are the concussion cases. The NFL is in the midst of trying to settle thousands of these cases because players didn’t know they shouldn’t keep playing after repeated shots in the head. The left-wing media has been all over that story.

There has also been the much-publicized wife-beating accusations though statistics show NFL players have a lower incidence of wife-beating than the average American. Wife-beating is an epidemic in the country.

The latest is a story ignored by the media until yesterday. It began in 1968 and allegedly continued until 2012.

Eight former NFL players—Richard Dent, Jim McMahon, Jeremy Newberry, Roy Green, J.D. Hill, Keith Van Horne, Ron Stone, and Ron Pritchard—filed a class-action lawsuit in May alleging that the NFL supplied them with illegally prescribed painkillers throughout their careers, which led to medical complications such as addiction later in life.

The NFL has just relaxed their pot rules because some players say it helps with pain. They’d better toughen them back up.

The plaintiffs in the suit claim they were unaware of the effects these drugs could have and seem to believe they are not responsible in any way. How is that even possible?

About 500 other players have signed on since, perhaps as many as 1300.

The suit alleges that the league turned them into addicts by passing out narcotic painkillers, sleeping pills, and more just so they could play and make money for the League.

Former player, JD Hill, who played for the Lions, said, “Yeah, I had never done a drug in my life. I join the NFL and I come out of there homeless and a junkie. I’d never done drugs in my life. The NFL turned me into a homeless junkie.”

Jeremy Newberry, center for the Forty Niners back in the nineties, claimed that half the team on game day got shot up with Toradol on their way out to the field. The drug is not a narcotic but it does require a prescription.

“The NFL and unlicensed trainers without prescriptions were just passing out these painkillers left and right and turning these guys into addicts, just to make ’em play so the NFL can earn big bucks!” The story goes.

Dr. Matthew J. Mattava, president of the NFL Physicians’ Society, has been an NFL doctor for 14 years. He said he has “seen first-hand the outstanding medical care that team doctors provide to players on and off the field….as doctors, we put our players first…”

Doctors put themselves in harm’s way for this job but they do it for the love of the sport and the players they care for, the doctors contend.

The media didn’t cover the story until the raids yesterday.

The DEA is raiding the teams, questioning or grilling players, doctors, nurses and they are calling the raids administrative investigations. The “inspections”, which were more like raids, entailed bag searches.

All of a sudden it warrants raids without warrants. At least there was no mention of warrants. The raids were launched in response to a civil lawsuit, not a criminal proceeding.

DEA agents, working in cooperation with the Transportation Security Administration agents, launched these “administrative investigations” Sunday. Six teams were spot-checked, not “targeted” according to law enforcement officials.

The San Francisco 49ers’ staff were checked at MetLife Stadium after playing the NY Giants and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ staff were checked in the airport after playing the Redskins. The Seattle Seahawks admitted they were subject to an inspection following their game in Kansas City.

It wasn’t only those two teams however – this is a sweep and it smacks of a fishing expedition which is supposed to be illegal.

An NFL official said multiple teams met with federal authorities on Sunday. “Our teams cooperated with the DEA today and we have no information to indicate that irregularities were found,” league spokesman Brian McCarthy said in a statement.

No one was arrested.

This attacks were led by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York — where the NFL is headquartered — but involves several U.S. attorney’s offices.

“This is an unprecedented raid on a professional sports league,” said Steve Silverman, one of the attorneys for the former players. “I trust the evidence reviewed and validated leading up to this action was substantial and compelling.”

I don’t know if the teams and the doctors are all guilty but is this the way we want “investigations” to proceed in this country?

The lawsuit alleges the NFL and its teams, physicians and trainers acted without regard for players’ health, withholding information about injuries while at the same time handing out prescription painkillers such as Vicodin and Percocet, and anti-inflammatories such as Toradol, to mask pain and minimize lost playing time. The players contend some teams filled out prescriptions in players’ names without their knowledge or consent, then dispensed those drugs — according to one plaintiffs’ lawyer — “like candy at Halloween” as well as combining them in “cocktails.”

The DEA said they had reason to look at the teams inspected Sunday in particular, but the investigation is not restricted to them, according to the law enforcement official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the probe is ongoing. It’s a sweep which brings many innocent people into the case.

In a sweep, everyone gets to be treated like a criminal.

The official said the investigation focuses on practices across the 32-team league, including possible distribution of drugs without prescriptions or labels and the dispensing of drugs by trainers rather than physicians.

The players apparently bear no responsibility for taking these substances.They are not being investigated themselves.

The NFL contends they are not responsible for actions of the teams. They are the ones with the money! The NFL asked the judge to remove them from the suit but that has not been ruled on yet.

The DEA has characterized their raids Sunday as “administrative” which probably means they kept their guns holstered and asked for cooperation unlike their performance at the Gibson Guitar factories

What happened to the good old days when the guilty parties were targeted instead of everyone and when law enforcement were required to get warrants before they terrorized people?

Why aren’t the players on the hook and why is the NFL when they really aren’t responsible for individual teams? Why is law enforcement acting like we live in Russia?

The media likes the story now because law enforcement gives them cover with their drug advertisers.

Watch drug smugglers walking within our borders via secureborderintel.org:

Read about drug smugglers here and here and here. I could go on endlessly on this issue presenting evidence the media doesn’t share.

Oh well, it’s all just administrivia.

Sources: Fusion and WaPo

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