Michael Moore’s “Cringe-Inducing” Play [Meant to Take Down Trump] Bombs

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Even free hot dogs won’t help Michael Moore and his narcissistic hate fest of a Broadway Show, The Terms of My Surrender. It’s bombing during its blessedly limited run.

Mediaite’s Larry O’Connor cited Broadway World, which reported the week ending Sept. 10 saw Moore’s show performing at only 38 percent potential.

It’s been going down since it opened. Within five weeks, it dropped.

“It’s pretty clear: Broadway (like much of America) hates Michael Moore,” O’Connor writes, noting even the “politically like-minded” The New York Times gave Moore a lousy review.

Tmes reviewer Jesse Green described “The Terms of My Surrender” as “a bit like being stuck at Thanksgiving dinner with a garrulous, self-regarding, time-sucking uncle. Gotta love him — but maybe let’s turn on the television.”

In the show, Moore lambastes the political right, as he has long done in his movies, but mostly brags on himself, according to the Times review.

While praising Moore’s activism, Green wrote, “Still, you don’t have to disagree with Mr. Moore’s politics to find that his shtick has become disagreeable with age. He wants to help liberals turn their Post Traumatic Trump Disorder into practical action.”

“Audiences hoping for a bit of feel-good liberal therapy, let alone a good show, may be disappointed to find that Mr. Moore isn’t very interested in them. He’s not preaching to the choir: He’s bragging to it,” Green added.

The play reviewed by a whole host of liberals was trashed. It’s been called an “unvarnished ego trip”, a “sloppy concoction” and a “cringe-inducing” play. Moore thought it would be the thing to take down Trump. It should be the thing to take him down but the left won’t care as long as he spews hate.

O’Connor believes that the reason for the low turnout is tourists come from the heartland and they like the President while Moore’s core supporters are in the Hamptons or some other rich man’s paradise.

The fact is that if it was any good, people would see it.

Michael Moore has been trying for another hit since his anti-Bush propaganda movie Farenheit 9/11 hit big in 2004. He’s bombed since then. His last film, Where to Invade Next, tanked. Then Trumpland, surpassing most grade D films in mediocrity, couldn’t make the $150 thousand it took to make it.

Moore wants you to think the limited engagement is because they have to make room for a new play. They actually have to make room for a play that brings in audiences.

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