Outlook for Workers Is Bleak Under Obama

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The new U.S. work place is largely focused on the unemployment line or the disability and welfare lines at the Social Security Administration

The workforce participation rate plunged to a 35-year low to 63.3% from July to August. We have an unprecedented number of U.S. workers not looking for work. Last month alone, we lost 312,000 people. The rate of unemployment continues to go down as more-and-more people leave the workforce.

The BLS numbers are absurd. We are NOT counting people who have given up looking for work!

The rosy jobs numbers published each month are always revised down.  The June-July numbers were revised down by 74,000 jobs from the delightful 195,000 to the dreary and bleak 121,000.

One mustn’t forget that this is WITH Bernanke’s monthly $85 billion dollar bailout.

This is the new normal.

President Obama made a big campaign issue out of cutting taxes and used the payroll tax cut as a prime example. After the election, workers were clobbered with the payroll tax being hiked back up. The cut of 2% was eliminated. Even workers making $30,000 a year took $50 a week less in take-home pay. The original cut was done for political reasons so he could say he cut taxes.

From Jan. 1 through July 31, 77% of jobs created were part-time. Fewer than one of four people hired got full-time work – the opposite of a normal economy. Obamacare has been blamed in many cases.

This is the new normal.

Obamacare requires employers with 50 or more employees to provide healthcare for those who work more than 29 1/2 hours in a week. That is why unions are most upset. They worked to win a 40 hour work week.

Local, city, state governments, universities, private sector businesses are cutting employees to part-time throughout the nation. This was all predicted before Obamacare was passed.

This is the new normal.

Defund the damn thing Congress!

Read an excellent article by Dr. Betsy McCaughey, former Lt. Gov. of New York on this topic.

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