President Obama – the New Reagan? Maybe He Meant Junior

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It’s hard to envision President Obama imitating anything Reagan did, but Obama frequently compares himself and/or his actions to Reagan(s) as he did  Monday night and on numerous other occasions. His Chiefs of Staff have often done the same. Invoking the comparison when one is the polar opposite provokes ridicule from anyone who is not a Democrat or Progressive Socialist, especially when he leaves out the defining details which make the comparison null and void.

At least if he’s going to emulate Reagan, he should get rid of Obamacare (I can dream, can’t I?)

Perhaps he is speaking of Ronald Regan’s youngest son, Ron Junior, who is a liberal Progressive/Socialist.

Then there are his frequent self-comparisons to Jefferson, FDR, Kennedy, even Gandhi and George Washington.

Maybe he should just stick to being himself, especially when he is trying to make a case for a debt ceiling increase, something to which he was vehemently opposed just three short years ago. That kind of partisanship doesn’t represent any of these historical heroes very well.

On Monday, President Obama said: Decrying a “partisan three-ring circus” in the nation’s capital, Obama assailed a newly minted Republican plan to raise the nation’s debt limit as an invitation to another crisis in six months’ time.

“The American people may have voted for divided government, but they didn’t vote for a dysfunctional government,” the president said in a hastily arranged prime-time speech. He appealed to the public to contact lawmakers and demand “a balanced approach” to reducing federal deficits – including tax increases for the wealthy as well as spending cuts>”

He said congressional leaders must produce a compromise that can reach his desk before the deadline.

Speaker Boehner said: – Responding moments later from a room near the House chamber, Boehner said the “`crisis atmosphere” was of the president’s making.

“The sad truth is that the president wanted a blank check six months ago, and he wants a blank check today. That is just not going to happen,” the speaker said. “The president has often said we need a `balanced’ approach, which in Washington means we spend more, you pay more.”

President Obama’s full speech: Full text of Obama’s debt ceiling speech

John Boehner’s full speech: Boehner’s debt ceiling speech

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