So How Did the Million Muslim March and Two Million Biker Ride Go? Update

Update: September 15, 2013: DC police estimate that between 800,000 and 1.2 million bikers rode through DC on 9/11 (per Belinda Bee who coordinated the event). About 25 people showed up to the Muslim march. Stunningly, the bikers were hardly mentioned by any news organization including Fox. It was a near-complete blackout. There were more reports about the Muslim mini-march of 25.

It is the 12th anniversary of the 9/11 attack on our countrymen by Muslim jihadists. It is also the day that a a group of Muslim Truthers thought would be a great day to protest their victimhood. It was originally labeled the Million Muslim March on DC and then renamed the Million American March Against Fear.

They changed the name because they didn’t want to be ‘scary.’ [Oh, please.]

The Million Muslim or American March or whatever had a turnout of about 25 people.

Mark Segraves of the NBC affiliate in Washington reported about 25 people were in attendance including Professor Cornell West and the organizers. A small group of Christians did confront all 25 of them but nothing came of it.

The bikers did not and never had any intention of confronting the Muslims. They were there to commemorate not confront.

This Muslim march was never expected to be much of anything. It was organized by a ragtag group of 9/11 Truthers and anti-semites. Their purpose in organizing the march on this day was to say they were victims too.

They are demanding their First Amendment rights, which they obviously have or they would not have been there with a permit no less. The bikers couldn’t get a permit for the park, but rode anyway.

If the bikers had a permit, it would have been a two-hour ride through but the lack of a permit meant they had to ride through the city causing traffic delays which they apologized for in advance on their Facebook page.

The speakers are pictured below.

 

Wow, what a crowd. Would you say it’s just shy of a million?

 

Quite a turnout.

Photos from wnd

There weren’t 2 million bikers but there were thousands. It was impressive. It took 50 minutes for them all to ride through. That’s a lot of motorcycles.

According to NBC News, one rider who was a Desert Storm veteran and a firefighter, Ken Mortello, had came from New Jersey. He said he ran to the Twin Towers in 2001 to help.

He remembered it this way, “He had a woman with third-degree burns. As he came through a tunnel, one tower collapsed. The tunnel that he was in collapsed — missed him by about two feet. Buried everybody else that was with him,” Mortello said.

He says some friends have still not gotten over that day, and that’s why he was riding Wednesday.

God bless the patriotic Americans who rode into DC on only a 4-week notice. Many of them were veterans, police officers, and members of motorcycle clubs.

I knew a number of people who died on 9/11/01. One of them was an usher at my wedding – Pete Ganci. He was the Chief of Chiefs of the NYPD. He knew the Towers were going to come down but he wouldn’t leave while his men were still inside. He died there, at the foot of the Towers, as the first building came down.

Thank you to all those Americans who care about those who died on 9/11/01 and 9/11/12 and who aren’t wallowing in false victimhood.

The bikers really shook up the Pinot Noir Libs who accused them of being criminals and Muslim haters. Nothing like stereotyping motorcyclists!

aerial photo

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Sara Noble

Sara Noble

Sara Noble, B.A. English Literature, St. John's University; M.S. Education, M.A. Administration, Hofstra University. World traveler. Worked with children as a teacher and school administrator for three decades. Published in educational journals, children's mystery magazines, and was an editor at This Week Magazine. I am devoted to an America that promotes free enterprise and ingenuity, values the Constitution as intended, and does not encourage a nanny state under the casuistic banner of "the common good". 

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