Socialist Policies Like Those of Brazil’s Can Get You Roads Like These!

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Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff was recently impeached for cooking the books to hide election-year spending or looting the state-owned oil company for her campaigns. But the real problems behind her fall are Rousseff’s socialist policies.

Rousseff was first elected in 2010 on the coattails of her mentor Luiz Inácio “Lula” da Silva — a leftist labor leader who exceeded expectations as president from 2003-2011. Da Silva benefited from the windfall of revenue from exports of oil, natural gas, minerals and agriculture goods — which convinced him that his bloated anti-poverty programs were sustainable.

Unfortunately, both da Silva and Rousseff ignored the dire need to improve education, reform tangled tax codes, fix stifling labor laws, invest in infrastructure or make it easier to create or operate a business.

A great example of their serious infrastructure problems is in the condition of their roads. Recently, farmers, tired of waiting for the government, built roads with pocket money.

According to DNIT official data, only about 13% of Brazilian roads are paved. Even with the high tax burden that people and companies pay to the government, including IPVA , the road conditions are precarious to say the least.

One Brazilian newspaper reported that a group of farmers in Mato Grosso lost their patience and decided to build a road with their own resources. There is still another 33 km to completely pave the road and the State said they’d pay up, but a new study was requested.

To remedy this requirement, the farmers themselves have also disbursed another R$450,000 to support this analysis and now demand concrete action from the authorities.

In this region, soybean planting and production expansion depends on the completion of the roads so that the loads can be transported. It is worth noting that in the stretches of land, especially in the rainy season, large mounds are formed and accidents and truck breaks are frequent, the newspaper article reports.

As you can imagine, the trucks break down a lot.

Take a look at the Socialist roads.

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