Trump to Cut Off $255 Million in Military Aid to Pakistan, Who’s Next?

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President Trump thinks outside the box and it’s unnerving to some but still others don’t believe he will follow through. They should believe. He’s coming after Pakistan.

PRESIDENT TRUMP TO WITHHOLD ALL MILITARY AID TO PAKISTAN

The NY Times reported Friday that the President might withhold the $255 million in military aid to Pakistan, largely out of frustration. Pakistan has been extremely uncooperative, most recently when a kidnapper of a Canadian-American family was captured.  He was a member of the Taliban-linked Haqqani network and the U.S. wanted to interview him. Pakistan refused.

Pakistan hid Osama bin Laden for a decade and they still have Dr. Afridi rotting in a jail cell. Dr. Afridia is the doctor who helped us in the bin Laden case.

The United States, which has provided Pakistan more than $33 billion in aid since 2002, said in August that it was withholding the $255 million until Pakistan did more to crack down on internal terrorist groups.

President Trump warned Pakistan last week while discussing national security strategy of the potential cut. “We make massive payments every year to Pakistan,” the President said. “They have to help.”

Vice President Mike Pence reinforced that message in a visit to Afghanistan just before Christmas, telling cheering American troops that “President Trump has put Pakistan on notice.”

The Pentagon has a history of working closely with the Pakistan military but the National Security Council (NSC) has watched Pakistan act like enemies who interfere in their neighbors’ affairs. There is even talk at the NSC of listing them as non-NATO allies.

Pakistan is a terror nation that’s barely under control. On the other hand, the Pakistan military sees protecting the Haqqani network as a national security issue.

The Hindustan Times was more definitive than the NY Times about what the President plans to do. Pakistan has ignored the administration’s warnings and President Trump will act to withhold the funds.

They also quoted the President in a statement to them which clarifies what the U.S. expects Pakistan to do. The U.S. expects Islamabad to take decisive action “against terrorists and militants on its soil”.

“The United States does not plan to spend the $255 million in FY 2016 in Foreign Military Financing for Pakistan at this time,” said a spokesperson of the President’s National Security Council in a statement to Hindustan Times.

“The President has made clear that the United States expects Pakistan to take decisive action against terrorists and militants on its soil, and that Pakistan’s actions in support of the South Asia Strategy will ultimately determine the trajectory of our relationship, including future security assistance.

“The Administration continues to review Pakistan’s level of cooperation.”

Pakistan doesn’t seem to care if aid is cut off.

“Pakistan can withstand a cutoff in American aid,” Husain Haqqani, Pakistan’s former ambassador to Washington, told the NY Times. “It would have to be followed by something else to make Pakistan believe that Mr. Trump means business.”

The President basically has to become more of a threat to Pakistan than the terrorists themselves, terrorists with whom they are somewhat sympathetic.

OTHER NATIONS NEED TO WORRY

Recently, when President Trump said he would move the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, recognizing it as the capital, he did something other presidents have vowed to do for decades but didn’t. Prior administrations caved to the threats of the radical Islamists, European Progressives and menaces like Russia. Whatever one may think of Donald Trump, he has immense courage and has gone where few politicians have gone before — he tries to fulfill campaign promises.

The ingrates in the U.N. lashed out at the U.S. with an insulting vote to condemn the U.S.. It had no force of law, but they made their point.

Daily Caller reporter Benny Johnson calculated how much we would save if we would stop sending money to these nations and it comes to $24 billion a year. That would send a nice message.

The figures come from USAID.GOV which has the amounts of contributions U.S. taxpayers make country-by-country and this is the breakdown of the aid given to those 128 frenemies:

  • Afghanistan — $5,060,306,050
  • Albania — $27,479,989
  • Algeria — $17,807,222
  • Andorra — $0
  • Angola — $64,489,547
  • Armenia — $22,239,896
  • Austria — $310,536
  • Azerbaijan — $15,312,389
  • Bahrain — $6,573,352
  • Bangladesh — $263,396,621
  • Barbados — $5,442,370
  • Belarus — $11,166,107
  • Belgium — $3,101,636
  • Belize — $8,613,838
  • Bolivia — $1,378,654
  • Botswana — $57,252,922
  • Brazil — $14,899,949
  • Brunei — $354,829
  • Bulgaria — $20,066,715
  • Burkina Faso — $74,469,144
  • Burundi — $70,507,528
  • Cabo Verde — $5,044,716
  • Cambodia — $103,194,295
  • Chad — $117,425,683
  • Chile — $2,266,071
  • China — $42,263,025
  • Comoros — $1,057,063
  • Congo — $8,439,457
  • Costa Rica — $14,650,552
  • Cote d’Ivoire — $161,860,737
  • Cuba — $15,776,924
  • Cyprus — $0
  • Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) — $2,142,161
  • Denmark — $3,455
  • Djibouti — $24,299,878
  • Dominica — $616,000
  • Ecuador — $26,014,579
  • Egypt — $1,239,291,240
  • Eritrea — $119,364
  • Estonia — $15,937,295
  • Ethiopia — $1,111,152,703
  • Finland — $33,492
  • France — $4,660,356
  • Gabon — $31,442,404
  • Gambia — $3,197,858
  • Germany — $5,484,317
  • Ghana — $724,133,065
  • Greece — $8,508,639
  • Grenada — $690,300
  • Guinea — $87,630,410
  • Guyana — $9,691,030
  • Iceland — $0
  • India — $179,688,851
  • Indonesia — $222,431,738
  • Iran — $3,350,327
  • Iraq — $5,280,379,380
  • Ireland — $0
  • Italy — $454,613
  • Japan — $20,804,795
  • Jordan — $1,214,093,785
  • Kazakhstan — $80,418,203
  • Kuwait — $112,000
  • Kyrgyzstan — $41,262,984
  • Laos — $57,174,076
  • Lebanon — $416,553,311
  • Liberia — $473,677,614
  • Libya — $26,612,087
  • Liechtenstein — $0
  • Lithuania — $15,709,304
  • Luxembourg — $0
  • Madagascar — $102,823,791
  • Malaysia — $10,439,368
  • Maldives — $1,511,931
  • Mali — $257,152,020
  • Malta — $137,945
  • Mauritania — $12,743,363
  • Mauritius — $791,133
  • Monaco — $0
  • Montenegro — $2,118,108
  • Morocco — $82,023,514
  • Mozambique — $514,007,619
  • Namibia — $53,691,093
  • Nepal — $194,286,218
  • Netherlands — $0
  • New Zealand — $0
  • Nicaragua — $31,318,397
  • Niger — $144,122,239
  • Nigeria — $718,236,917
  • Norway — $100,000
  • Oman — $5,753,829
  • Pakistan — $777,504,870
  • Papua New Guinea — $14,836,598
  • Peru — $95,803,112
  • Portugal — $207,600
  • Qatar — $95,097
  • Republic of Korea (South Korea) — $3,032,086
  • Russia — $17,195,004
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines — $612,000
  • Saudi Arabia — $732,875
  • Senegal — $99,599,642
  • Serbia — $33,062,589
  • Seychelles — $223,002
  • Singapore — $468,118
  • Slovakia — $2,585,685
  • Slovenia — $715,716
  • Somalia — $274,784,535
  • South Africa — $597,218,298
  • Spain — $81,231
  • Sri Lanka — $27,192,841
  • Sudan — $137,878,835
  • Suriname — $232,672
  • Sweden — $1,269
  • Switzerland — $1,168,960
  • Syria — $916,426,147
  • Tajikistan — $47,789,686
  • Thailand — $68,182,970
  • The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia — $31,755,240
  • Tunisia — $117,490,639
  • Turkey — $154,594,512
  • United Arab Emirates — $1,140,659
  • United Kingdom — $3,877,820
  • United Republic of Tanzania — $628,785,614
  • Uruguay — $836,850
  • Uzbekistan — $20,067,933
  • Venezuela — $9,178,148
  • Vietnam — $157,611,276
  • Yemen — $305,054,784
  • Zimbabwe — $261,181,770

The total comes to $24,485,383,599 in one year and it averages $205,795,526 per country.

In mid-March, Director of the Office of Manag­ement of Budget Mick Mulvaney told reporters ahead of the budget proposals the administration planned to cut the State Department’s foreign aid program by 28 per cent. “Foreign aid gets reduced,” said the US official while explaining budget cut was not a judgement on the State Department’s performance but because foreign aid happens to fall within the department’s functions.

Trump let it be known that he was taking names of those who would vote against the U.S. but many of the nations don’t take it seriously. He has to act. Pakistan is a good place to start. They don’t work with us because they like or appreciate us.

What we have been doing hasn’t worked. We need to try something different and going to war has not been to our advantage. We have other leverage besides bombing them and money is one of those tools.

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5 COMMENTS

  1. Unfortunately Pakistan is NOT OUR FRIEND, (Having hid Osama Bin Ladin so we could not get to him, and allowing the Taliban and ISIS to escape across the border and thumb their noses at us after killing our sons and fathers.) If you found out your supposed best friend had raped you girl, how long would he be your best friend. It is time for us to admit reality. Neville Chamberlain kept appeasing the Nazis until England was about to go under. The Beatles sang: “Can’t Buy Me Love” Thank you Mr. Churchill.

  2. I just had a great idea!! Why don’t we appoint Osama Obama roving ambassador and Secretary of State and give him a big C5 Cargo plane to fly around the worlds giving our cash money to people who hate us; First stop,
    Barack is North Korea………………………………………………………….

  3. What these nations, particularly those like Pakistan fail to realize is that President Donald J. Trump is unlike his predecessors. Sure, they talk a big game about not needing our money but the bottom line is that they want it.

    Unfortunately, Trump’s predecessors have allowed these ungrateful scoundrels to spit in our faces time and time again.

    Send a message and make it hurt. Better yet, let Hussein Obama foot the bill.

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