Tyranny : Connecticut Gun Bills Eviscerate Private Gun Ownership

gun control in CT

Connecticut’s Senate Bill 1076, which is currently before the General Assembly’s Public Safety and Security Committee, is an alarming example of tyranny. The bill includes any semiautomatic firearm that has one military-style characteristic and the capacity to accept a detachable magazine.

It also makes it near-impossible to own a gun because of expense and difficulty of registration.

They want to ban 80% of Colt Manufacturing Co’s guns which will cost most of their employees their jobs.

It will require criminal background checks for every purchase but it so much more than that. Read the bill to find out for yourself.

Senate Bill 505 will limit the purchase of a rifle or a long gun.

House Bill 6595 prohibits the discharge of firearms near private residences which would jeopardize gun clubs throughout the state, clubs which predated the homes.

Mexico has strict gun laws like this and it obviously hasn’t made Mexicans safer. They are less safe. The normal Mexicans have a country overrun by gangsters and are easily victimized by them.

SENATE BILL 1076:

FORCED STATE REGISTRATION OF EVERY FIREARM  AND IT WON’T BE EASY OR CHEAP

Sec. 32. (NEW) (Effective July 1, 2013)

(a) Every person in this state shall register each firearm he or she owns or possesses in accordance with sections 31 to 43, inclusive, of this act.
(b) Any person owning or possessing a firearm on the effective date of this section shall apply to register the firearm in accordance with sections 31 to 43, inclusive, of this act not later than one year after said date.
(c) On and after July 1, 2014, no person shall deliver a firearm, and no person shall receive or obtain a firearm, until all of the following have occurred:

(1) The buyer or transferee has completed an application to register the firearm in accordance with section 35 of this act;
(2) The seller has verified that the prospective registrant is the person whose motor vehicle operator’s license or other government-issued identification card is contained in the application;
(3) The seller has transmitted the completed application to register the firearm to the department in a manner prescribed by the department; and
(4) The seller has provided a receipt for the application to the prospective registrant on a form to be prescribed by the department.

(d) A person shall be deemed to have complied with subsection (a) of this section for a firearm if he or she produces a valid receipt indicating that he or she has applied to register that firearm in accordance with sections 31 to 43, inclusive, of this act and the application is pending.

REQUIRED PERMITS FOR AMMUNITION WHICH REQUIRE PROOF YOU HAVE A LEGITIMATE USE FOR THE AMMUNITION – THIS WILL BE ABUSED 

Sec. 33. (NEW) (Effective July 1, 2013)

(a) On and after July 1, 2014, no person shall purchase or possess ammunition without having first obtained a registration card identifying a firearm suitable for use with that ammunition.
(b) On and after July 1, 2014, no person shall deliver ammunition without having first verified that the ammunition purchaser possesses a registration card for a firearm that is suitable for use with that ammunition or a receipt demonstrating that the person has applied to register a suitable firearm in accordance with sections 31 to 43, inclusive, of this act and the application is pending.

REGISTRATION WILL BE DIFFICULT AND EXPENSIVE – IT WILL BECOME AN ATM FOR THE LEGISLATORS 

Sec. 35. (NEW) (Effective July 1, 2013) (a) Any person who is required to register a firearm under sections 31 to 43, inclusive, of this act shall:

(1) For a newly purchased firearm:

(A) Obtain a registration application from the seller of the firearm to be registered; and

(B) complete and submit to the firearm seller the application, in writing, signed under penalty of false statement, on a form prescribed by the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection.

(2) For a firearm that was lawfully owned or possessed on the effective date of this section, was brought into this state by a new resident or was acquired by operation of law upon the death of the former owner:

(A) Appear in person at a time and place designated by the department; and (B) complete and submit to the department the application, in writing, signed under penalty of false statement, on a form prescribed by the department.
(b) Any person who is required to register a firearm shall provide the following information on a registration application prescribed by the department, which form shall include:

(1) The applicant’s full name and any other name by which the applicant has ever been known;
(2) The home address and telephone number of the applicant;
(3) The occupation, business address and business telephone number of the applicant;
(4) The applicant’s gender, race, height, weight, date of birth, place of birth, country of citizenship, social security number and, if the applicant is not a United States citizen, alien or admission number;
(5) A copy of the applicant’s current motor vehicle operator’s license or other government-issued identification card containing a photograph of the applicant;
(6) Information concerning any denial or revocation of a license, permit, certificate or registration card pertaining to any firearm owned or possessed by the applicant;
(7) The make, model, manufacturer’s name, caliber or gauge and serial number and any other distinguishing numbers of all firearms for which the applicant seeks to obtain a registration card;
(8) The date the applicant acquired each firearm;
(9) The name, address and telephone number of the person from whom each firearm was obtained and, in the case of a firearms dealer, the dealer’s license number;
(10) The name of, and description of any instance in which, any court, board, commission or other lawful authority has done either of the following, including dates of commitment and release:

(A) Determined that the applicant, as a result of marked subnormal intelligence, mental illness, incompetency, condition or disease, was a danger to himself or herself or others, lacked the mental capacity to contract or manage his or her own affairs, was not guilty of a crime by reason of mental disease or defect or was incompetent to stand trial; or
(B) Involuntarily committed the applicant to a hospital for psychiatric disabilities, including the name and address of the hospital;

(11) An authorization and release to obtain information relevant to the applicant’s eligibility to register a firearm pursuant to sections 31 to 43, inclusive, of this act from any source, that waives any right to confidentiality and requests the disclosure of such information to the department for the sole purpose of determining the applicant’s eligibility to register a firearm pursuant to sections 31 to 43, inclusive, of this act;
(12) The applicant’s right thumbprint;
(13) Two identical color photographs of the applicant’s face, frontal view, two inches square in size, taken within the thirty days immediately preceding the date of application, as specified in regulations of the department; and
(14) Any additional information the department deems necessary to process the application.

(c) On and after July 1, 2014, the department may charge a fee to cover the administrative costs of the registration for each firearm.

ANNUAL REGISTRATION RENEWALS – ANOTHER ATM FOR LEGISLATORS

Sec. 41. (NEW) (Effective July 1, 2013)

(a) Registration cards shall expire automatically one year after the date of issuance. To apply for renewal of a registration card, the registrant shall complete an application for registration as described in section 35 of this act.
(b) The Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection shall mail renewal notices to each registrant at least ninety days prior to expiration of the registration card. Applications for renewal shall be received by the department sixty days prior to the expiration of the current registration card.
(c) The renewal process for all registrants shall include a background check, as provided in section 36 of this act.
(d) The department shall follow the procedures of section 37 of this act in approving or denying the application for renewal.

Nothing these shoot-from-the-hip legislators are proposing would have saved the lives of the children in Newtown. In Newtown, a legal gun owner allowed her guns to be used illegally and her son, the murderer, was bright enough to use a bomb had the weapons not been available. To think that he could not as easily have made a bomb of fertilizer is naive.

The Connecticut bills only keep guns out of the hands of legal gun owners and make Connecticut residents less safe. Time-and-again criminals have said they stay away from the homes of gun owners.

Connecticuts laws make New York’s look flexible, which they are not. They infringe mightily on the Second Amendment. Everyone in the country should be concerned about what these liberal states do because their laws will become commonplace and acceptable in time. Once we give up one amendment to the Bill of Rights, others will follow and there will always be a good reason.

Read more at GOP USA and CT Second Amendment Discussion

Share on Google+Print this pageEmail this to someoneShare on RedditShare on StumbleUponShare on Tumblr