UN Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) Will Be Negotiated Next Year When Barack Obama Has “More Flexibility”

July 28, 2012
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This is the statue in front of UN headquarters in NYC. It’s a simple revolver. That should tell you something about the UN’s true intent.

The NRA, the GOA, CCRKBA, various other gun rights’ organizations, and numerous sporting organizations as well as a number of senators, many up for re-election, have slowed the pace of the global arms treaty (ATT or Arms Trade Treaty), but it is coming back.

The new target date for negotiations is sometime next year when Obama begins his second term as the “more flexible” President.

President Obama has been told by aides to hold off on this treaty until after his re-election because it is a bipartisan loser for him. Democrats have guns too – they hunt and skeet shoot like the rest of us.

The U.S. claims they want a treaty that “will contribute to international security, protect the sovereign right of states to conduct legitimate arms trade, and meet the objectives and concerns that we have been articulating throughout the negotiation, including not infringing on the constitutional right of our citizens to bear arms.”

The treaty won’t disallow citizens from bearing arms but it will force restrictions of gun manufacture, sales and ownership that will make private gun ownership difficult at best.

The draft of the treaty can be read here. Read between the lines and don’t forget that Iran had a leading role in its formulation. Munitions and ammo have been removed but the original language required stamping of ammo and munitions which would have made ammo cost prohibitive and dangerous to even use.

Once this treaty is passed, they can do anything they want and add any restriction they want.

The first line of the Preamble to the draft should be enough to alarm people. It reads that the treaty is Guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations. The fact that the U.N. is comprised of socialists, communists and dictators should concern people. They are NOT our friends.

Read KrisAnneHall’s interpretation. As a constitutional lawyer, she can add to the common sense reading we will give to it.

The following press release from the state department could not be clearer. The U.S. supports a second round of negotiations next year and it will be signed and ratified if Barack Obama returns to office with a Democratic Senate.

Arms Trade Treaty Conference

Press Statement
Victoria Nuland
Department Spokesperson, Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
July 27, 2012

The United States supports the outcome today at the Arms Trade Treaty Conference. While the Conference ran out of time to reach consensus on a text, it will report its results and the draft text considered back to the UN General Assembly (UNGA). The United States supports a second round of negotiations, conducted on the basis of consensus, on the Treaty next year; we do not support a vote in the UNGA on the current text. The illicit trafficking of conventional arms is an important national security concern for the United States. While we sought to conclude this month’s negotiations with a Treaty, more time is a reasonable request for such a complex and critical issue. The current text reflects considerable positive progress, but it needs further review and refinement.

With that in mind, we will continue to work towards an Arms Trade Treaty that will contribute to international security, protect the sovereign right of states to conduct legitimate arms trade, and meet the objectives and concerns that we have been articulating throughout the negotiation, including not infringing on the constitutional right of our citizens to bear arms. The United States took a principled stand throughout these negotiations that international trade in conventional arms is a legitimate enterprise that is and should remain regulated by the individual nations themselves, and we continue to believe that any Arms Trade Treaty should require states to develop their own national regulations and controls and strengthen the rule of law regarding arms sales.

We support an Arms Trade Treaty because we believe it will make a valuable contribution to global security by helping to stem illicit arms transfers, and we will continue to look for ways for the international community to work together to improve the international arms transfer regime so that weapons aren’t transferred to people who would abuse them.

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