President Trump Will Keep Fighting for the Citizenship Question! Updated

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President Donald Trump on Wednesday called news reports and statements by members of his administration that the Commerce Department would drop its plans to ask people if they are U.S. citizens on the 2020 census “fake news.” He will keep fighting.

Yesterday, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and a Justice Department lawyer said that the Census Bureau is currently printing the questionnaire without the citizenship question.

The Supreme Court last week in a decision had effectively blocked the question being added to the 2020 census questionnaire. They ordered the case challenging the question to be reconsidered by a lower court.

President Trump blasted out the following statement on Twitter Wednesday morning:

The News Reports about the Department of Commerce dropping its quest to put the Citizenship Question on the Census is incorrect or, to state it differently, FAKE! We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the importance of the answer to this question.

THE FACT IS IT’S ESTABLISHED PRECEDENT, JUST ASK CLINTON AND OBAMA

DeRoy Murdock, a syndicated columnist, addressed the issue on America’s Newsroom when the news broke.

He said there is a precedent for the question and that’s all the government had to say instead of getting stuck in the weeds during the arguments.

The administration should not give up, Murdock said. He reviewed the fact that the question was on the census since 1820 at the suggestion of Thomas Jefferson.

When Chuck Schumer’s vile quote was put up on the screen, Murdock explained that the question was used on the 2000 census by Bill Clinton and Barack Obama used it eight times on the American Community Survey, both in English and Spanish.

THE DOJ HAS BEEN ORDERED TO LOOK FOR A WAY FORWARD

A lawyer with the Department of Justice said Wednesday that agency officials have been ordered to determine whether there is a way the administration can include a citizenship question on the 2020 census, The Hill reported.

Joseph Hunt, an assistant attorney general with DOJ’s civil division, said the department has been “instructed to examine whether there is a path forward, consistent with the Supreme Court’s decision, that would allow us to include the citizenship question on the census.”

“We think there may be a legally available path under the Supreme Court’s decision. We’re examining that, looking at near-term options to see whether that’s viable and possible,” Hunt said, according to a transcript of a teleconference held in federal court in Maryland.

“It’s very fluid at present because we are still examining the Supreme Court’s decision to see if that option is still available to us,” Hunt added, according to the transcript.

 


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