Brat Pack! Kids of the elite traveled to NYC to riot, one’s the son of comic book elite

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The son of a famous comic book writer traveled from his home in Portland to rampage in New York City. His father’s work inspired Stumptown and his mother is of the comic book elite. He was one of the Black Lives Matter rioters busted in a window-smashing rampage.

The 20-year-old was one of eight charged with felony riot. Several appear to be rich and elite hypocrites. They damaged and vandalized banks, Starbucks, and Duane-Reades.

The protest was organized by the groups “New Afrikan Black Panther Party” and the “Revolutionary Abolitionist Movement.” It became a three-hour marathon of destruction that caused at least $100,000 in damages, authorities said.

Rucka is the son of two accomplished comic book writers, Greg Rucka, a New York Times best-selling author, and Jennifer Van Meter, according to his father’s online bio.

He worked on popular comic books such as Batwoman, Detective Comics, Action Comics, in addition to co-authoring the New York Times best-selling graphic novel series, “Lazarus,” according to his site.

Van Meter also has acclaim in the comic world, having written award-nominated issues and series for Dark Horse, DC, and Marvel Comics, according to her own online bio.

THE BRAT PACK

The Post called them the Brat Pack.

Upper East Sider, Clara Kraebber, the daughter of an architect and a child psychiatrist with a second home in Connecticut, five others arrested appear to also come from privileged backgrounds. That led to one police source to call their actions “the height of hypocrisy.”

THEY WERE VIDEOTAPED

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17 COMMENTS

  1. Black people face strife that white people do not. You as a white person have the privilege to ignore the struggles of people of color. That is your white privilege. These kids – white people speaking out and protesting peacefully in support of equality is in no way shape or form, some sort of brat pack mentality. We all should be one voice for change. If you cannot walk in another person’s shoes, then stand behind them and show your support. Otherwise, if you cannot say anything kind, say nothing at all.

  2. Black people face strife that white people do not. You as a white person have the privilege to ignore the struggles of people of color. That is your white privilege. These kids – white people speaking out and protesting peacefully in support of equality is in no way shape or form, some sort of brat pack mentality. We all should be one voice for change. If you cannot walk in another person’s shoes, then stand behind them and show your support. Otherwise, if you cannot say anything kind, say nothing at all.

  3. The true believer comrades are protesting the lack of heavy whipping cream at Starbucks.
    They have it so rough posting up on Iphones and Macbooks because the wifi isn’t fast enough.
    It must be so hard to be bored and sniveling while living in big mcmansion with a trust fund.
    A tiny violin plays Misty and there is a tear in my prole beer.

  4. Let me tell you about black privilege in the early 1970s. Had a black roommate in college who was a football player on scholarship (full ride). PE major but never studied, barely went to class, white girls did his homework, cleaned his side of room and slept with him. His parents were teachers so not exactly ghetto types. I, white, paid for my college education by working construction jobs in summer and washing dishes in the college cafeteria, played baseball as a walk-on and made the Dean’s list. Fast forward to my career in science and engineering for 40 years, we were screaming for black scientists and engineers and wanted to hire them but there were so few. Ran across three in my 40 years.

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