Super Pricey Electric Bus Goes Ablaze While Parked, Unoccupied

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Hamden FD, Facebook photo of the burning electric bus in CT

Connecticut’s governor Ned Lamont and Senator Chris Murphy spent $25.7 million on a project to replace buses with electric buses. Twelve were delivered, and one went ablaze just sitting, parked, engine turned off, and with no one in it. The federal taxpayers fully paid for the project.

According to CT Insider, they received a dozen with ten more on the way, but they’re all pulled from service over the bus going ablaze due to a lithium battery fire. It’s “out of an abundance of caution,” said the spokesperson. Nothing to see here.

According to the Hamden Fire Department, the bus was unoccupied. It was just sitting there, CT Insider reported.

According to CT Transit spokesperson Josh Rickman, the buses won’t return until after an investigation.

“Lithium-ion battery fires are difficult to extinguish due to the thermal chemical process that produces great heat and continually reignites,” said the Hamden Fire Department.
They received an $11.4 million federal grant of federal taxpayer money for the project. They also got two other federal taxpayer grants, one for $7.4 million and another for $6.7 million. It will allegedly get the US off oil. EVs do require electricity which relies on coal in the US.

In other words, people in Nebraska or Texas helped to pay for these buses, which cost twice as much as gas buses, which don’t go ablaze for no reason. We support EVs but they should not be rushed before they are ready for market. We can’t afford this.

The buses are New Flyers made in Minnesota.


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Testing 123
Testing 123
2 months ago

Better have some good insurance…looks like a death trap on wheels.

Bob ross
Bob ross
2 months ago

Leftists: At least it was only spewing heavy metals everywhere instead of carbon dioxide…

Vetmike
Vetmike
2 months ago

Gosh! Does that mean lithium battery vehicles aren’t safe?