TX AG tells judge to free ‘unjustly jailed’ salon owner after “misguided abuse of power”

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Shelley Luther owns a Dallas Salon and had to open her shop to feed her family. Likewise, her employees need to feed their families. She opened minutes after Governor Abbott okayed the opening of salons. All her employees had masks and were stationed 6 feet apart. She also had sanitizer stations available.

She was ordered by Judge Moye to apologize to him and remain closed. Ms. Luther refused and he imprisoned her for a week, while saddling her with oppressive fines. She was immediately taken into custody.

The Texas attorney general sent a letter urging the Dallas judge to free Ms. Luther. He said she was “unjustly jailed.” He also called it a “misguided abuse of power.”

Well, the judge’s little ego was offended, after all.

As a mother, Ms. Luther wanted to feed her children,” Paxton said in his letter. “As a small business owner, she wanted to help her employees feed their children. Needless to say, these are laudable goals that warrant the exercise of enforcement discretion.”

Luther was given three choices by the judge: She could offer an apology for selfishness, pay a fine and shutdown until Friday, or serve jail time.

He apparently didn’t like her polite response. “I have to disagree with you, sir, when you say that I’m selfish because feeding my kids is not selfish,” she told the judge. “I have hairstylists that are going hungry because they would rather feed their kids. So sir, if you think the law is more important than kids getting fed, then please go ahead with your decision. But I am not going to shut the salon.”

Governor Abbott agrees:

“I join the Attorney General in disagreeing with the excessive action by the Dallas Judge, putting Shelley Luther in jail for seven days,” Abbott said. “As I have made clear through prior pronouncements, jailing Texans for non-compliance with executive orders should always be the last available option. Compliance with executive orders during this pandemic is important to ensure public safety; however, surely there are less restrictive means to achieving that goal than jailing a Texas mother.”

Texas Senator Curz also commented:


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Ed Petrovski
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Ed Petrovski
3 years ago

Misguided abuse of power? Try “Criminal abuse of power.”

trajan61
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trajan61
3 years ago

Give me Liberty or I will bring you Death.

coco
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coco
3 years ago

So sad. When I joined the service I had to raise my right hand to promise that I would obey all lawful orders and that I would defend the constitution of the united states against …. (and here it gets dicey) foreign and domestic… threats. Well folks, we got a lot of domestic threats against the constitution. You know that living document that doesn’t really mean what it says… yaaaa that old piece of parchment… So we now have law enforcement flagrantly disregarding the constitution for a paycheck… dumb… cuz when that old scrap of paper no longer is relevent.. guess what???? yup your now screwed toooo.

sturmudgeon
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sturmudgeon
3 years ago

Barry: This is exactly why we are where we are today. Different strokes for different folks. The lady is supposed to be blind when she deals out Justice… but she is not.

Barry Ripley
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Barry Ripley
3 years ago

Government officials rarely punish each other. That’s one of their unspoken rules – kinda like cops very rarely give another cop a speeding ticket. They’re above the law. Only common citizens get punished.

DAN III
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DAN III
3 years ago
Reply to  Barry Ripley

Mr. Ripley,

You are 101% spot on ! Two sets of laws….one for der untermenschen and one for TPTB.