U.S. Chamber of Commerce Is in China Undermining the President

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The U.S. Chamber of Commerce sent a delegation to China this week to hold planning sessions with the communist regime. They are neither supportive of the President’s approach or the U.S. worker, and they appear to be undermining the President. They are meeting in advance of the official talks between the U.S. and China.

They are globalists, anti-Brexit in their outlook and have no desire to fight for America.

When you read the Chamber’s Myron Brilliant’s opening remarks, it appears that he and the entire Chamber of Commerce are undermining the negotiations because they disagree with the approach.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the China Center for International Economic Exchanges (CCIEE) began their ‘deliberations’ today.

The discussions are led by U.S. Chamber Executive Vice President and Head of International Affairs Myron Brilliant and CCIEE Chairman and Former Vice Premier Zeng Peiyan, and include top business leaders and senior government officials from both countries.

In his opening remarks, Brilliant says:

…Current protectionist trends risk tipping an already weakened global economy into recession, or worse.

Given this increasingly challenging context, let me share with you where the U.S. Chamber stands on this set of issues, including U.S.-China economic relations.

We continue to believe that agreements or other measures that create more open, market-driven trade and investment flows, and innovative technologies, are beneficial to the economies undertaking them.

Moreover, we are opposed to protectionism of all kinds and unilateral tariffs, in particular.

We have consistently opposed the use of such tariffs by the United States over the past two years, and retaliatory measures by China. [Where has that gotten us?] We are deeply concerned about their damaging impact on the U.S., China, and global economies.

We have been the unquestioned leaders in expressing such views publicly and privately to the U.S. Administration, the Congress, and the American people.

He goes on to say how supportive they are of the U.S.-China trade but they understand the administration’s frustration with subsidies, market access, protection of intellectual property, forced technology transfer, and digital trade and regulation.

In late August, when China put retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods, Brilliant said, “Today’s Chinese retaliation is unfortunate but not unexpected. The fact of the matter is that nobody wins a trade war, and the continued tit-for-tat escalation between the U.S. and China is putting significant strain on the U.S. economy, raising costs, undermining investment, and roiling markets. It’s time to get back to the table and complete an agreement that deals with the thorny issues of tech transfer, IP enforcement, market access, and the damaging global impact of subsidies.”

The Chamber is content with shipping jobs overseas and letting China strip us of our wealth. They can’t be of help in our humble opinion.

The Chamber doesn’t want energy regulatory rollbacks either. It affects their bottom line.

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