UK’s EV Police Cars Struggle to Reach Crime Scenes

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Electric police cars in the UK are struggling to reach crime scenes and emergencies without running out of power.  They need power for sirens, lights and to run the thing. The EV isn’t cutting it.

Officers in rural areas cannot find charging points on patrol and are having to switch to petrol or diesel vehicles, The UK Sun reported.

UK’s EV police carpetrol or diesel vehicles, The UK Sun reported.

“The design options available for electric vehicles for operational uses are not perhaps as advanced as I would like them to be.

“So, let’s put it like this, I’m cautious about going any further down that road at this stage.

“If an officer is out on a road traffic accident and his lights are on, his radio is on, his heater is on, I would not want him to run out of power simply because he is in an electric car.”


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mostly grey
mostly grey
4 months ago

Average EV range being 300 miles and full charge rate of 4 hrs. equals a trip of 1400 miles taking 40 + hrs. When the same trip can be made in 23 hrs. So you’re looking at making the trip in a week in your EV when you can make the same trip in a day and a half in your gas powered buggy. Now matter how well they try and package their climate change dealio, the numbers and simple facts don’t add up. You guessed it, the whole climate change dealio is nothing more than a wealth redistribution plan, aimed at redistributing what wealth you have obtained into their pockets.

GuvGeek
GuvGeek
4 months ago
Reply to  mostly grey

Two driver can make the trip in under a day!

GuvGeek
GuvGeek
4 months ago

EV technology is not ready for prime time and won’t be for at least 25 years.

Ronald Harms
Ronald Harms
4 months ago

For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened. Romans 1:21 . . This is what happens when you think you’re smarter than God . . . and worship creation rather than the Creator. . .thinking up foolish ideas.

BigJohn
BigJohn
4 months ago
Reply to  Ronald Harms

And your comment has what to do with electric vehicles?

Ghost Gun
Ghost Gun
4 months ago

Is it ethical to purchase a lithium battery powered EV?
“Each mine usually consists of thirty-five to forty humongous 797 Caterpillar haul trucks along with hundreds of other large equipment,” he writes. “Each 797 uses around half a million gallons of diesel a year. So, with an inventory of just thirty-five the haul trucks alone are using 17.5 million gallons of fuel a year for just one lithium site.”
A typical EV battery, Stein notes, weighs 1,000 pounds, contains 25 pounds of lithium, 60 pounds of nickel, 44 pounds of manganese, 30 pounds of cobalt, 200 pounds of copper and 400 pounds of aluminum, steel and plastic. Inside are over 6,000 individual lithium-ion cells.
“It should concern you that all those toxic components come from mining,” he writes. “For instance, to manufacture each EV auto battery, you must process 25,000 pounds of brine for the lithium, 30,000 pounds of ore for the cobalt, 5,000 pounds of ore for the nickel, and 25,000 pounds of ore for copper. All told, you dig up 500,000 pounds of the earth’s crust for just one battery.”
Stein argues that fossil fuels are vastly cleaner, partly because they are so efficient.
And once the mining and consequent environmental degradation are complete, electric vehicles in reality run overwhelmingly on fossil fuels and nuclear power.
An EV, after all, doesn’t make electricity, it only stores electricity that is produced elsewhere. And the sources primarily are coal, uranium, natural gas-powered plants and occasionally the wind and the sun.
“So, to say an EV is a zero-emission vehicle is not at all valid as 80 percent of the electricity generated to charge the batteries is from coal, natural gas, and nuclear,” writes Stein.
In effect, 20% of the EVs on the road are powered by coal, 40% by natural gas and 20% by nuclear power.
Hinderaker adds that the extraordinary volume of mining needed to produce electric vehicles not only is “environmentally disastrous,” it also carries “large human costs.”
The cobalt that is needed for every electric vehicle comes mostly from the Congo, where the United Nations Children’s Fund estimates 40,000 children are working in cobalt mines.
And Hinderaker emphasizes that the solar panels that produce some of the energy stored in EV batteries are mostly produced by slave labor in China.
“And, for what it’s worth, Chinese solar panels are produced with coal-fired power plants.”
https://www.cfact.org/2022/06/07/is-it-ethical-to-purchase-a-lithium-battery-powered-ev/