Wikipedia Uses “Potentially Unreliable” Sources and Editors

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Elon Musk posted on X that Wikipedia is hierarchical and subject to the biases of its editors. He’s getting some criticism for the comment.

In July 2021, Wikipedia cofounder Larry Sanger warned that the website could no longer be trusted. He called it left-leaning establishment propaganda.

Mr. Sanger told Unherd Lockdown TV that he started the Encyclopedia of Opinion in 2001 purely on the idea that it would offer true neutrality and multiple points of view on hot-button issues.

Now he insists the conservative voices are sternly warned that they will be kicked out if they try to add a different take on establishment issues.

For instance, Sanger said, “You can’t cite the Daily Mail at all. You can’t cite Fox News on socio-political issues, either. It’s banned. So what does that mean? It means that if a controversy does not appear in the mainstream center-left media, then it’s not going to appear on Wikipedia.”

Wikipedia itself suggests it can’t be trusted as it uses “potentially unreliable sources” because the requirement for writing articles is “verifiability, not truth.” They rely on what is written in external sources, yet not all sources are equal. Wikipedia gives general advice and what is and isn’t reliable. As they said, all news media sources make mistakes.

Also, George Soros financially supports Wikipedia, and he is the antithesis of all things conservative. He is a brilliant influencer of the hard left.

Sanger said, “There are companies like Wiki PR, where paid writers and editors will go in and change articles. Maybe there’s some way to make such a system work, but not if the players who are involved and who are being paid are not identified by name — they actually are supposed to be identified by name and say, ‘we represent this firm’ if they are officially registered with some sort of Wikipedia editing firm. But they don’t have to do that.”


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