Cherokee Genealogist Says Elizabeth Warren’s Not a Cherokee

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A Cherokee genealogist traced Elizabeth Warren’s ancestry to the Trail of Tears. What he found shouldn’t startle anyone.

Warren has no Cherokee blood. A mixed Native-American woman explained to Fox host Jesse Waters that a Cherokee genealogist traced Elizabeth Warren’s heritage and she “Doesn’t have a single Cherokee ancestor’”.

Warren was listed as a “woman of color” in the 1993 Harvard student journal. When questioned about it in 1996, Warren couldn’t remember any of it, but when she was listed as the Harvard Law’s “first woman of color” in a 1997 law review piece on diversity and affirmative action, it was based on a “telephone interview with Michael Chmura, News Director, Harvard Law (Aug. 6, 1996).”

In 2012 Warren admitted she told Harvard Law she was Native American.

The Telegram reported on May 3, 2012 that lineage information along with the following massive lies.

Warren said she had no idea that her Native American heritage was touted by Harvard as proof of its faculty’s diversity in the 1990s.

“I think I read it on the front page of the Herald,” Warren said. “I don’t even remember,” she added, when asked about a 1996 article in the Harvard Crimson touting her minority status.

As the story heated up, she said she was “proud” of her Native American heritage and explained that, while she had no documentation of ancestry, she learned of her roots through family lore.

She admitted that she listed herself as a minority in law school directories for more than 10 years. The reason she gave? She wanted to meet people with tribal roots.

“I listed myself in the directory in the hopes that it might mean that I would be invited to a luncheon, a group, something that might happen with people who are like I am,” she said.

Her claim is also based on the family’s high cheekbones. [She also goes on the warpath a lot]

She said her great-great-great grandmother O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford was Cherokee. However, she was listed as white on the 1860 census.

HERE ANCESTORS MIGHT HAVE SHED CHEROKEE BLOOD

Warren’s family history not only doesn’t include Cherokees, but rather, her great-great-great grandfather, Jonathan Crawford, might have rounded them up and he definitely fought them.

Crawford served in the East Tennessee Mounted Infantry Volunteer Militia commanded by Brigadier General R. G. Dunlap from late 1835 to late 1836. Crawford was a member of Major William Lauderdale’s Battalion and they are the ones who rounded up 4,000 Cherokee families living in Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee, beginning in January, 1837, tore them from their homes and forced them to walk thousands of miles to barren lands. It was called the ‘Trail of Tears’. Many died along the way.

Crawford doesn’t appear to be a member of the troops who escorted them. He  did, however, serve once more with Major William Lauderdale’s re-formed Batallion of Tennessee Mounted Infantry Volunteer Militia. This group fought the Seminole Indians in Florida during the Second Seminole War. Crawford arrived in Florida in November, 1837, and served there for six months until his unit was disbanded in Baton Rouge, Louisiana the following May.

Warren also plagiarized “Indian” recipes for her cousin’s cookbook titled PowWow Chow and, get this, she stole them from a famous French chef. The recipes were favorites of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and Cole Porter.

7 COMMENTS

  1. Warren’s use of fake Cherokee ancestry allowed her to take advantage of the system and gain undeserved opportunities. Claiming she had Cherokee ancestry because her family has high cheek bones is like saying you have African ancestry because you like watermelon. This is what racism really looks like!

  2. Many families have stories like “We were descended from a Cherokee princess” or George Washington or whatever, they don’t bother checking them before they keep the story going. She didn’t bother to do the research she just used the story to put her career on fast track. Why didn’t Harvard ask for documentation before they listed her as their first woman of color?

    • i say i might be of some indian. my family comes from that area.and since 1760(from Scotland). and many of us tan much more than white europeans. or it comes from slaves. but i would never use this thought for any gain.

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