This Is What Happened to the 10 House GOP Impeachers

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The ten Republicans in Name Only who voted to impeach Donald Trump lost too many of their voters. The only primary for one of the ten pro-impeachment GOPers that isn’t decided yet is Liz Cheney, who serves as a hatchet woman on the Jan. 6 subcommittee.

THE TEN

Liz Cheney will face primary voters next week in her at-large district, but recent polling indicates she’s facing an uphill battle against the Trump-backed Harriet Hageman. She is trying to win by begging Democrats to vote for her.

Jaime Herrera Beutler (Wash.) became the latest Republican who impeached former President Trump to lose her primary bid after she conceded on Tuesday night, one week after her primary in Washington state. Trump-endorsed candidate Joe Kent won her seat.

Anthony Gonzalez, a former NFL player who was first elected in 2018, announced in September 2021 that he would not seek a third term in the House, months after impeaching Trump. Less than two months after the former president’s second impeachment, Trump endorsed his former aide, Max Miller, in his challenge to Gonzalez.

John Katko, who represents Syracuse, N.Y., and other upper parts of the state, announced almost exactly one year after impeaching Trump that he would retire at the end of his term.

Adam Kinzinger voted to impeach the former president and now serves on the House Jan. 6 witch hunt subcommittee. He announced in Oct. 2021 that he would retire at the end of the term, which also came after redistricting maps approved by Illinois lawmakers drew him into the same district as Rep. Darin LaHood (R), who was endorsed by Trump just before the primary. LaHood won his primary in June.

Peter Meijer (MI) became the second pro-impeachment Republican defeated in their primary last week, losing by less than four percentage points to Trump-backed candidate John Gibbs.

Dan Newhouse is one of only two pro-impeachment Republicans to survive a primary challenge. He faced six challengers last week, including Loren Culp, a former police chief backed by Trump, and former NASCAR driver Jerrod Sessler, who was in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 6. At least one of the challengers was put in to weaken the votes for Loren Culp.

Tom Rice was the first Republican who backed Trump’s second impeachment to lose reelection. Former state Rep. Russell Fry defeated Rice by more than 25 percentage points, or roughly 22,500 raw votes.

David Valadao served in the House from 2013 to 2019 before being ousted by former Rep. T.J. Cox (D-Calif.). In a 2021 rematch, Valadao won back his seat and voted to impeach Trump one day after being sworn in. Trump didn’t endorse anyone to oppose Valadao, but Valadao is still in for a tough race. Many Republicans will stay home.


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nom
nom
1 month ago

Hopefully, Lez Cheney will be gone from office.

Em Gee
Em Gee
1 month ago
Reply to  nom

She is toast. Wyoming hates her

BKMart
BKMart
1 month ago

Newhouse was a Dominion Special, they run a bunch of candidates in a primary and salt the vote around ensuring the winner they want.

James Williams
James Williams
1 month ago

The article should have pointed out that the combined vote for Republican candidates in the 4th District other than Newhouse was almost double the vote for Newhouse himself. He survived only because the opposition was fragmented. It’s not likely that he will be that lucky in 2024. This is one case where – even though Trump made an endorsement — it failed to narrow the field enough to get any Newhouse opponent on the ballot in November.

Last edited 1 month ago by James Williams
Fed Up in NY
Fed Up in NY
1 month ago

I hope Cheney doesn’t get rewarded for her actions.  :wpds_mad: 

Last edited 1 month ago by M Dowling
Phrank
Phrank
1 month ago

How is it possible, ethical or legal for a “Democrat” to get to vote for which REPUBLICAN candidate for Senate should be on the general election ballot?

Fed Up in NY
Fed Up in NY
1 month ago
Reply to  Phrank

Every state has their own crazy rules. They can change affiliation for the primary and go back after the primary.

Last edited 1 month ago by Fed Up in NY
UncleJack
UncleJack
1 month ago
Reply to  Phrank

In MA, an “unenrolled” voter can grab either ballot on primary day and stay unenrolled.