DoJ takes back their take back that Viking Guy wanted to kill people

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The DoJ said that some of the rioters planned to kidnap and kill congresspeople. Then the DoJ took it back. Now they are taking that back and say the Viking guy, Mr. Chansley, was trying to kidnap and kill people.

Federal prosecutors in the filing asked an Arizona judge to detain Jacob Chansley, an Arizona man. He was pictured wearing face and body makeup and buffalo horns while standing at Vice President Mike Pence’s desk in the Senate.

Dubbed the Viking Guy, he’s actually the Buffalo Horns Guy.

Chansley, the Viking Guy, is a radical climate change/Green New Deal guy who protests regularly for the climate.

The FBI, according to the DOJ, investigated Chansley. He reportedly left a note on the vice president’s desk saying that “it’s only a matter of time, justice is coming.”

THE WORD OF A CRAZY VIKING GUY

A portion of the federal prosecutors’ Thursday filing states: “Strong evidence, including Chansley’s own words and actions at the Capitol, supports that the intent of the Capitol rioters was to capture and assassinate elected officials in the United States government.”

According to a Friday report from Reuters, prosecutors said the charges against Chansley “involve active participation in an insurrection attempting to violently overthrow the United States government and that Chansley is a serious flight risk.

“Chansley has spoken openly about his belief that he is an alien, a higher being, and he is here on Earth to ascend to another reality,” prosecutors added in the filing.

He also reportedly phoned the FBI after the riots. Chansley was “glad he sat in the vice president’s chair. Why? Because he says, “Vice President Pence is a child-trafficking traitor.”

He’s allegedly a big Trump supporter and QAnon follower. But he’s also an alien, a higher being, and a climate extremist.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Derp State central casting Starbucks barista who enjoys crowds.
    The terminal peak stupidity…it burns.

    Satire is prophecy. This makes effective satire difficult because reality so soon catches up with it. Satire is also dangerous and perhaps even irresponsible, for no idea is too absurd, it seems, for our political masters and bureaucratic elite to take seriously and put into practice – at public expense, of course, never their own.

    Sometimes reality is far in advance of satire when it comes to absurdity. The results, however, are not always funny.

    Theodore Dalrymple, June 4, 2011.

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