Saddam Hussein’s WMD’s Might Turn Up in Syria

ARE YOU SURE?

Saddam tried to buy uranium from Niger. Bush said so in his State of the Union address in 2003. He was ridiculed by the left for saying it.

The British government later learned that Bush’s comments were well-founded and that Saddam did indeed try to buy significant quantities from Africa. A British intelligence report on July 14, 2003 verified the Bush evidence.

A separate report by the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee on July 7th said the U.S. had a number of intelligence reports proving Bush’s statements.

Oddly, former Amb. Joe Wilson, who said Bush’s comments were a lie, gave the CIA information that confirmed Iraq was seeking uranium from Niger.

The forged Italian documents everyone made so much of were never used as evidence by Britain or the U.S.

I have always believed that the WMD’s, which were small enough to fit into suitcases, were transported to Syria. We certainly gave them enough time as they ignored the U.N. directives nine times in as many years. Iran recently said they had them and gave them to terrorists, though I believe that might be something they said to rattle our cages.

However, there was an interesting comment in Newsday today in an article entitled, Obama warns Syria on WMD (p.A44).

The important paragraph is this one:

Syria acknowledged last month for the first time that it has what is believed to be among the biggest chemical and biological weapons programs in the world. Assad’s military regime is believed to have mustard gas of the type used by Saddam Hussein against Iran and Iraq’s Kurdish minority in the 1980′s….

These are probably Saddam’s WMD’s!

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Sara Noble

Sara Noble

Sara Noble, B.A. English Literature, St. John's University; M.S. Education, M.A. Administration, Hofstra University. World traveler. Worked with children as a teacher and school administrator for three decades. Published in educational journals, children's mystery magazines, and was an editor at This Week Magazine. I am devoted to an America that promotes free enterprise and ingenuity, values the Constitution as intended, and does not encourage a nanny state under the casuistic banner of "the common good". 

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