The Federal Trade Commission Is Now The Candy Police

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The government wants voluntary marketing guidelines to combat childhood obesity, click if you want to add a comment. They are also recommending what the content of the food should be. It’s yet another crisis. If we are all going to die soon due to global warming, can’t we at least have our junk food? I don’t want to minimize the problem of childhood obesity, of course I care about it, but the government can’t control everything and they shouldn’t.

Personally, I want the nanny government to get lost. Why do parents need help getting their children to eat healthier foods when all they have to do is just say no? We can add all the government we want, but it won’t make parents better parents. Besides, it will start out as voluntary and end up mandatory.

I can envision candy makers being dragged off to prison or fined out of existence. Just look at what is happening to Gibson Guitars and tell me I’m wrong.

This is their statement, legitimate on its face: The proposed voluntary principles are designed to encourage stronger and more meaningful self-regulation by the food industry and to support parents’ efforts to get their kids to eat healthier foods. While the goals they would set for food marketers are ambitious and would take time to put into place, the public health stakes could not be higher. One in three children is overweight or obese, and the rates are even higher among some racial and ethnic groups.

“Children are strongly influenced by the foods they see advertised on television and elsewhere. Creating a food marketing environment that supports, rather than undermines, the efforts of parents to encourage healthy eating among children will have a significant impact on reducing the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. “These new Principles will help food and beverage companies use their creativity and resources to strengthen parents’ efforts to encourage their children to make healthy choices.”

“As a parent and grandparent, I know the power advertising and marketing can have on kids, and my hope is that the food industry will embrace thesevoluntary principles and apply them so parents can make informed decisions about the foods they feed their children,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

“To their credit, some of the leading companies are already reformulating products and rethinking marketing strategies to promote healthier foods to kids. But we all have more work to do before we can tip the scales to a healthier generation of children,” said FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz. “This proposal encourages all food marketers to expand voluntary efforts to reduce kids’ waistlines.”

 

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