EPA Gets What It Wanted Before It Caused the Massive Toxic Spill

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"SILVERTON, CO - AUGUST 11: Cement Creek, which was flooded with millions of gallons of mining wastewater, is viewed on August 11, 2015 in Silverton, Colorado. The Environmental Protection Agency accidentally released approximately three million gallons of wastewater into the creek from the Gold King mine, polluting the larger Animas River downstream. (Photo by Theo Stroomer/Getty Images)"
“SILVERTON, CO – AUGUST 11: Cement Creek, which was flooded with millions of gallons of mining wastewater, is viewed on August 11, 2015 in Silverton, Colorado. The Environmental Protection Agency accidentally released approximately three million gallons of wastewater into the creek from the Gold King mine, polluting the larger Animas River downstream. (Photo by Theo Stroomer/Getty Images)”

Some have accused the EPA of deliberately causing the massive toxic spill which flooded into the Animas and San Juan Rivers. The purpose would be to get control of the area with their Superfund designation. It sounded outlandish at first, but maybe not. The latest announcement that they are basically treating it as a Superfund site and putting up a temporary water treatment facility at the site of the spill, something they’ve wanted for years, could be just happenstance.

It’s something to consider however. This government is not trustworthy. Who knows what they are capable of.

For years, the EPA has been trying to get the town of Silverton and surrounding areas to sign on as a Superfund site. They wanted to control the land and build a water treatment facility. The majority wanted no part of it because they were hoping to attract the mining industry and other businesses back. Nothing destroys business better than a big government presence with their heavy, often pointless regulations.

The residents also didn’t want the EPA to control their private land.

On August 5th, the EPA went onto the privately-owned Gold King mine and caused a massive toxic spill of more than 3 million gallons of toxic metals.

They went on the property without permission and they caused the spill. Since then, they have been busy poisoning minds as well as the water with propaganda about their Superfund and the need to have the EPA in the region.

It’s very ironic since they performed in an extremely incompetent manner and have continuously lied about it or concealed facts.

Five months before the Animas River toxic spill disaster, leaders from the tiny Colorado mining town of Silverton pleaded with EPA officials to not perform tests that would declare the area a Superfund site.

Animas 5
Animas River after the spill

The Environmental Protection Agency turned a deaf ear and said they would search out “widespread soil contamination” from historic mines. The town was tested five years ago and no problems were found.

“The fact is that our mission is to protect human health and the environment and not to stick our heads in the sand and not look,” declared Steve Wharton, head of a Superfund response team, according to a March 27 article that appeared in the local Silverton Standard newspaper.

They then proceeded to create the toxic spill.

One geologist thinks the EPA created the mess to give itself another Superfund site to work on.

Five days before the breach, the Silverton Standard ran a letter to the editor from a Dave Taylor, who said he had 47 years’ experience as a professional geologist.

The letter describes with technical detail how the EPA will create a scenario where “the water will find a way out and exfiltrate uncontrollably through connected abandoned shafts, drifts, raises, fractures…contamination may actually increase due to the disturbance and flushing action within the workings.”

Taylor accused the EPA of creating the mess to get “a foot in the door to justify its hidden agenda for construction of a treatment plant.”

The inevitable has happened. The EPA is now saying they will build a temporary water treatment facility at the site and they’ve begun bidding it out.

The Durango Herald reported that the EPA on Thursday released a long-term monitoring plan to evaluate water conditions after the spill.

In other words, it’s basically a Superfund site but there is little choice now.

Navajo President Begaye showing a sample of the filthy, oily water the EPA sent for their cattle and crops.
Navajo President Begaye showing a sample of the filthy, oily water the EPA sent for their cattle and crops.

Unfortunately, on the 9th, Russell Begaye, president of the Navajo Nation, requested the region be listed as a Superfund site. Any hope the community had to bring back business is dashed.

It will bring in money to clean up the area but with it comes the EPA and their regulations, inadequate knowledge, and incompetent supervision of contractors. They are the government and they are here to help.

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1 COMMENT

  1. If the ahem, ‘accidental spill’ occurred in Silverton, why would they want to build a water treatment facility there, and not downstream? Gee … this doesn’t sound too much like a land grab, does it!?!? (Being facetious!).

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