What the FBI Looks for in a Terrorist These Days

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This is interesting and a little funny – the latest FBI “Communities Against Terrorism” Suspicious Activity Reporting flyers are posted on publicintelligence.net. Some make sense and some could lead to problems for the average person by an overly zealous enforcer.

Everything could be suspicious when all their flyers are put together, and there’s little focus on people who might be terrorists because we have to be PC.

Honestly, none of these things are terrible, but they are repetitive and constantly evade the real significant signs of terrorism. They are barely worth the paper they are written on.

If you go to Internet cafes or have a paintball field you are on the “suspect” list. If you want skuba diving lessons quickly, you are to be looked at carefully. If you pay cash, use different names (your moms and yours), are late with payments or are a deadbeat, you are to be looked at as out of the norm (not in this economy).

And, for the Lord’s sake do not say anything anti-US or you will be in big trouble. If that sounds a little anti-first amendment, that’s because it is since they don’t define what they mean by anti-American. Nancy Pelosi thinks Tea Party Grandmas are anti-American.

As an example, these are the people you have to consider suspicious in hotels and motels:

Guests who

 Request specific room assignments or locations.

 Use cash for large transactions or a credit card in someone else’s name.

 Arrive with unusual amounts of luggage.

 Make unusual inquiries about local sites, including government, military, police, communications, and power facilities.

 Refuse cleaning service over an extended time.

 Use entrances and exits that avoid the lobby.

 Abandon a room and leave behind clothing and toiletry items.

 Do not leave their room.

 Change their appearance.

 Leave the property for several days and then return.

Since I always like to request rooms, use cash often, have tons of luggage (my makeup alone needs its own suitcase), sometimes I skip cleaning service because they come at the wrong time, don’t necessarily go through the lobby and always forget shampoo, I am pretty suspicious. I can also see myself asking where a government facility might be to photograph it so that would probably get me thrown in the slammer.

I think honeymooners who don’t leave their room could be very suspect.

If you are missing fingers or have burns or shave your beard, that’s a big “uh oh.”

Tourists who take photos of government buildings are on most of the lists. The picture taking issue bothers me. When I went to D.C. a number of arrogant government guards wouldn’t let me snap pictures of the outside of government buildings – monuments and historic buildings. Photos of these buildings are all over the Internet, but I can’t take a picture as a tourist? Trust me, I don’t look like a terrorist.

Finally, the sleeper cell section talks about people from radical Islamic countries – praise the Lord! I don’t see suspicious activity around mosques mentioned but watch out for people who go to Internet cafes and use anonymous IP’s.

I’m not saying we should profile but some radicals are a significant threat which our current administration would have us believe is not the case.

If Israel strikes Iran, you’ll see who the terrorists are in the United States. We have open borders so you know they are here.

 

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